USA flag logo/image

An Official Website of the United States Government

Company Information:

Company Name:
Atlas Scientific
Address:
1367 Camino Robles Way
San Jose, CA 95120-4925
Phone:
(408) 507-0906
URL:
N/A
EIN:
770281491
DUNS:
938515913
Number of Employees:
5
Woman-Owned?:
No
Minority-Owned?:
No
HUBZone-Owned?:
No

Commercialization:

Has been acquired/merged with?:
N/A
Has had Spin-off?:
N/A
Has Had IPO?:
N/A
Year of IPO:
N/A
Has Patents?:
N/A
Number of Patents:
N/A
Total Sales to Date $:
$ 0.00
Total Investment to Date $
$ 0.00
POC Title:
N/A
POC Name:
N/A
POC Phone:
N/A
POC Email:
N/A
Narrative:
N/A

Award Totals:

Program/Phase Award Amount ($) Number of Awards
SBIR Phase I $2,504,468.96 31
SBIR Phase II $6,787,750.00 11
STTR Phase I $269,910.00 4
STTR Phase II $750,000.00 1

Award List:

MULTI-BY-PASS CONCENTRIC PULSE TUBE COOLER

Award Year / Program / Phase:
1996 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$69,950.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
Ali Kashani , President
Abstract:
N/a

MULTI-BY-PASS CONCENTRIC PULSE TUBE COOLER

Award Year / Program / Phase:
1997 / SBIR / Phase II
Award Amount:
$599,440.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
Ali Kashani , President
Abstract:
N/a

High Efficiency 10K Pulse Tube Cooler

Award Year / Program / Phase:
1998 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$69,990.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
Abstract:
N/a

N/A

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2000 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$99,836.00
Agency / Branch:
DOD / USAF
Principal Investigator:
Ali Kashani, President
Abstract:
N/a

N/A

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2000 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$69,993.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
Ben Helvensteijn, Senior Scientist
Abstract:
N/a

Zero Boil Off Storage of Liquid Hydrogen Using a Linear-Drive Pulse Tube Cooler

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2001 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$69,759.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
Ben Helvensteijn, Senior Scientist
Abstract:
Future NASA missions will involve transportation and/or storage of liquid hydrogen tanks for use as propellant. If no precautions are taken substantial amounts of liquid may be lost by evaporation due to inevitable parasitic heat loads well before cryogen utilization. Cryocoolers may intercept… More

A Linear-Drive Pulse Tube Cooler for Applications Below 6K

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2001 / SBIR / Phase II
Award Amount:
$599,924.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
Ben Helvensteijn, Senior Scientist
Abstract:
Various planned NASA missions depend on the availability of reliable and efficient coolers that achieve temperatures below 6K. These coolers are needed as the upper stage for lower temperature coolers such as dilution refrigerators or adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators. Astronomical missions… More

A Linear-Drive Pulse Tube Cooler for Applications Below 6K

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2001 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$0.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
Ben Helvensteijn, Senior Scientist
Abstract:
Various planned NASA missions depend on the availability of reliable and efficient coolers that achieve temperatures below 6K. These coolers are needed as the upper stage for lower temperature coolers such as dilution refrigerators or adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators. Astronomical missions… More

Pulse Tube Coolers for HTS Power Generation Systems

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2001 / SBIR / Phase II
Award Amount:
$747,572.00
Agency / Branch:
DOD / USAF
Principal Investigator:
Ali Kashani, Program Manager
Abstract:
Superconducting generators and RF magnets will be the leading technologies for high electrical power systems on aircraft, spacecraft and ground based systems in future DoD applications. These systems employ High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) materialsoperating at cryogenic temperatures. Future… More

Pulse Tube Coolers for HTS Power Generation Systems

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2001 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$0.00
Agency / Branch:
DOD / USAF
Principal Investigator:
Ali Kashani, Program Manager
Abstract:
Superconducting generators and RF magnets will be the leading technologies for high electrical power systems on aircraft, spacecraft and ground based systems in future DoD applications. These systems employ High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) materialsoperating at cryogenic temperatures. Future… More

A Multi-Stage Hybrid 10 Kelvin Cooler

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2002 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$99,373.00
Agency / Branch:
DOD / USAF
Principal Investigator:
Ali Kashani, Program Director
Abstract:
"We propose to develop a multi-stage hybrid cooler capable of providing 1 W of cooling at 10 K. To achieve the most efficient and reliable hybrid cooler possible, we propose to combine a multi-stage, linear-drive pulse tube with a low-temperaturereverse-Brayton stage. In this way we will take… More

A Magnetic Refrigerator for Cooling at 2 K

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2002 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$69,752.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
Ali Kashani, Program Director
Abstract:
NASA requires cooling of detectors for space telescopes. Detector temperatures as low as 0.05 K are being specified for a number of missions. A number of physics experiments proposed on the International Space Station require very low temperatures as well. Thus, NASA has identified a dilution… More

A 10W @ 20K Cooler for Spaceport of Cryogenic Fluids

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2002 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$69,313.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
Ali Kashani, Principal Investigator
Abstract:
For the spaceport of cryogenic fluids (e.g., liquid hydrogen) NASA requires cryocoolers that can provide more than 10W of cooling at 20K. We propose to develop a two-stage 20K pulse tube cooler (PTC) to fulfill this need. PTCs embody the high efficiency, high reliability, and low vibration required… More

A Magnetic Refrigerator for Cooling at 2 K

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2002 / SBIR / Phase II
Award Amount:
$599,689.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
Ali Kashani, Program Director
Abstract:
NASA requires cooling of detectors for space telescopes. Detector temperatures as low as 0.05 K are being specified for a number of missions. A number of physics experiments proposed on the International Space Station require very low temperatures as well. Thus, NASA has identified a dilution… More

Hybrid Cooler System for Superconducting Electronics

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2002 / STTR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$70,000.00
Agency / Branch:
DOD / MDA
Principal Investigator:
Ali Kashani, Program Director
Research Institution:
University of Wisconsin-Madison
RI Contact:
Charles Hoffman
Abstract:
"We propose to develop an innovative 10 K cooling system that will be ideally suited to the cryogenic packaging requirements of a space-based superconducting electronics system. To achieve the most efficient and reliable hybrid cooler possible, we proposeto combine a multi-stage, linear-drive pulse… More

A 20K Cooler for the Spaceport of Liquid Hydrogen

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2003 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$69,990.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
Ali Kashani, Principal Investigator
Abstract:
For the future spaceport and storage of liquid hydrogen NASA requires cryocoolers that can provide more than 10W of cooling at 20K. The closed-cycle cooling alternatives currently available for such applications are not well suited to their requirements. In many cases reliability is low and… More

Thermal Management of Solid-State Devices Using Nanotechnology

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2003 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$69,917.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
Ali Kashani, Principal Investigator
Abstract:
Future NASA programs will utilize solid-state devices (e.g., detectors, processors) that require cooling. Thermal management is of critical importance for a variety of solid-state devices. As the size of solid-state devices continues to shrink, device performance and reliability is limited by the… More

A Multi-Stage Hybrid 10 Kelvin Cooler

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2004 / SBIR / Phase II
Award Amount:
$742,207.00
Agency / Branch:
DOD / MDA
Principal Investigator:
James Maddocks, Research Scientist
Abstract:
Future Department of Defense space-based systems will require long-life, active cryocoolers capable of achieving sub-10 K load temperatures. Currently, the available cryocooler technology at these temperatures is too massive and inefficient. In many cases, reliability is low and vibration high.… More

A 20K Cooler for the Spaceport of Liquid Hydrogen

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2004 / SBIR / Phase II
Award Amount:
$599,662.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
Ali Kashani, Principal Investigator
Abstract:
For the future spaceport and storage of liquid hydrogen NASA requires cryocoolers that can provide more than 10W of cooling at 20K. The closed-cycle cooling alternatives currently available for such applications are not well suited to their requirements. In many cases reliability is low and… More

Thermal Management of Solid-State Devices Using Nanotechnology

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2004 / SBIR / Phase II
Award Amount:
$599,945.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
Ali Kashani, Principal Investigator
Abstract:
Future NASA programs will utilize solid-state devices (e.g., detectors, processors) that require cooling. Thermal management is of critical importance for a variety of solid-state devices. As the size of solid-state devices continues to shrink, device performance and reliability is limited by the… More

Rectified Continuous Flow Loop for Thermal Control of Large Deployable Structures and Distributed Loads

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2004 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$69,908.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
James Maddocks, Principal Investigator
Abstract:
Future instruments and platforms for NASA's Earth Science Enterprises will require increasingly sophisticated thermal control technology, and cryogenic applications will become increasingly more common. For example, Fourier Transform Spectrometers capable of high-accuracy cloud-profile measurements… More

Miniature Turbine for Pulse-Tube/Reverse-Brayton Hybrid Cryocooler

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2004 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$69,973.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
James Maddocks, Principal Investigator
Abstract:
Many future advances in NASAys ability to perform cutting edge space science will require improvements in cryogenic system technology, including the development of light-weight, low vibration, highly-efficient, long-life cryocoolers. One such cooler, currently under development, is the… More

High-Efficiency, Low-Temperature Regenerators for Cryocoolers

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2004 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$69,584.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
Ali Kashani, Principal Investigator
Abstract:
Future NASA planetary and astrophysics missions will require various enhancements in multi-stage cryocoolers. These include increased efficiency, reduced vibration and reductions in overall system mass and power consumption. For the small coolers required, pulse tube and Stirling coolers offer the… More

Hybrid Cooler System for Superconducting Electronics

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2004 / STTR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$0.00
Agency / Branch:
DOD / MDA
Principal Investigator:
James Maddocks, Senior Research Scientist
Research Institution:
University of Wiscosin-Madison
RI Contact:
Diane Barrett
Abstract:
Atlas Scientific, in conjunction with the University of Wisconsin Cryogenic Engineering Group, is developing an innovative 10 K cooling system that is ideally suited to the cryogenic packaging requirements of a space-based superconducting electronics system. To achieve the most efficient and… More

Miniature Long-Life Cooler for Portable Gamma Ray Detectors

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2005 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$99,994.98
Agency:
DHS
Principal Investigator:
Abstract:
This proposal describes a battery operated cryocooler to be used for cooling High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors, commonly used for the detection of gamma rays. HPGe detectors are highly suitable for identifying nuclear materials, which is of great interest in the Department of Homeland Security… More

High Performance Long-Life Cooler for Transportable Gamma Ray Detectors

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2005 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$99,999.98
Agency:
DHS
Principal Investigator:
Abstract:
This proposal describes a transportable cryocooler to be used for cooling High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors, commonly used for the detection of gamma rays. HPGe detectors are highly suitable for identifying nuclear materials, which is of great interest in the Department of Homeland Security… More

High-Efficiency, Low-Temperature Regenerators for Cryocoolers

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2005 / SBIR / Phase II
Award Amount:
$599,445.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
Ali Kashani, Principal Investigator
Abstract:
Future NASA planetary and astrophysics missions will require various enhancements in multi-stage cryocoolers. These include increased efficiency, reduced vibration and reductions in overall system mass and power consumption. For the small coolers required, pulse tube and Stirling coolers offer the… More

Rectified Continuous Flow Loop for Thermal Control of Distributed Loads

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2005 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$98,428.00
Agency / Branch:
DOD / MDA
Principal Investigator:
James Maddocks, Senior Engineer
Abstract:
Future instruments and platforms for Missile Defense Agency space applications will require increasingly sophisticated thermal control technology, and cryogenic applications will become increasingly more common. While a number of cryogenic refrigeration systems may be considered for such… More

Zero Boil Off System for Cryogen Storage

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2005 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$69,623.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
James Maddocks, Principal Investigator
Abstract:
This work proposes to develop a zero boil off (ZBO) dewar using a two-stage pulse-tube cooler together with two innovative, continuous-flow cooling loops and an actively cooled shield. While a number of cryogenic refrigeration systems may be considered for such applications, none offers the same… More

A 4-Kelvin Pulse-Tube/Reverse-Brayton Hybrid Cryocooler

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2006 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$69,727.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
James R. Maddocks, Principal Investigator
Abstract:
NASA's ability to perform cutting edge space science, including lunar and planetary exploration, requires the use of cryogenically cooled detectors and sensors for advanced scientific instruments and telescopes. For example, to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of cryogenic IR focal plane arrays it… More

Integration of Superconducting Electrical and Thermal Circuits for Microscale Cooling

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2006 / STTR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$99,950.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
Ben Helvensteijn, Principal Investigator
Research Institution:
San Francisco State University
RI Contact:
Kenneth R. Paap
Abstract:
Microcalorimetry is an enabling technology for many NASA space science missions because it permits detection of single photons at high rates with unprecedented energy resolution and efficiency. This remarkable technology relies upon superconducting devices that must be cooled below 100 mK. We… More

SBIR Phase I: Dry Nano Adhesive Based on Carbon Nanotubes

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2007 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$99,991.00
Agency:
NSF
Principal Investigator:
Abstract:
The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I Project will develop a flexible, reusable, two-sided, dry, thermally and electrically conductive adhesive film consisting of a dense vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNT) embedded in a flexible polymer matrix. The polymer chosen… More

A Thermal Switch for Space Applications

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2008 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$99,965.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
James R. Maddocks, Principal Investigator
Abstract:
Various planned NASA missions require thermal switches for active thermal control. As an example cryocoolers, including redundant coolers are incorporated on select missions. The redundant coolers operate when deteriorating or defunct coolers are deactivated. However, integration of redundant… More

Thermally Conductive Tape Based on Carbon Nanotube Array

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2008 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$99,970.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
James R. Maddocks, Principal Investigator
Abstract:
Future NASA missions require thermal control systems that can accommodate large changes in ambient temperature. The two essential aspects of an effective thermal interface material (TIM) are high compliance and high thermal conductivity. Thermal interface materials (TIM) are often used to fill the… More

High Performance Cryogenic X-ray Spectrometer for Chemical Analysis of Dilute Samples

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2008 / STTR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$99,960.00
Agency:
DOE
Principal Investigator:
Research Institution:
San Francisco State University
RI Contact:
Ken Paap
Abstract:
Many critically important biological processes ¿ such as oxygen production during photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation, biogenic hydrogen production, and the evolution of the bioavailability of heavy metal contaminants ¿ are associated with changes in the oxidation state of metal ions. The most… More

A Liquid Hydrogen Cooler with a Cooling Capacity of 20 Watts

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2009 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$99,908.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
James R. Maddocks, Principal Investigator
Abstract:
For the future spaceport and long-term storage of liquid hydrogen NASA requires cryocoolers that can provide cooling power in the range of 20 watts at 20 K. The closed-cycle cooling alternatives currently available for such applications are not well suited to the requirements. In many cases… More

Thermally Conductive Tape Based on Carbon Nanotube Array

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2009 / SBIR / Phase II
Award Amount:
$599,927.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
James R. Maddocks, Principal Investigator
Abstract:
Future NASA missions require thermal control systems that can accommodate large changes in ambient temperature. The two essential aspects of an effective thermal interface material (TIM) are high compliance and high thermal conductivity. Thermal interface materials (TIM) are often used to fill the … More

SBIR Phase II: Dry Thermal Adhesive Based on Carbon Nanotubes

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2009 / SBIR / Phase II
Award Amount:
$499,993.00
Agency:
NSF
Principal Investigator:
Abstract:
This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project seeks to develop a flexible, double-sided, dry adhesive ""tape"" that is applicable to science, space, industry and home use. The thermally and electrically conductive tape will be detachable and reusable, and, will not have the… More

Regenerators for Liquid Hydrogen Cryocoolers

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2009 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$99,918.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
James R. Maddocks, Principal Investigator
Abstract:
Future NASA exloration, planetary and astrophysics missions will require various enhancements in multi-stage cryocoolers. These include increased efficiency, reduced vibration and reductions in overall system mass and power consumption. For the small coolers required, pulse tube and Stirling coolers… More

Integrated Circulator for Regenerative Cryocoolers

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2009 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$100,000.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
James R. Maddocks, Principal Investigator
Abstract:
Future instruments and platforms for NASA space applications will require increasingly sophisticated thermal control technology, and cryogenic applications will become increasingly more common. For example, the Single Aperture Far-IR (SAFIR) telescope and other cryogenic telescope missions must… More

Novel Regenerators for Use Below 35 Kelvin

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2009 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$99,739.00
Agency / Branch:
DOD / MDA
Principal Investigator:
Ali Kashani, Program Director
Abstract:
Future MDA missions will require various enhancements in multi-stage cryocoolers. These include increased efficiency, reduced vibration and reductions in overall system mass and power consumption. For the small coolers required, pulse tube and Stirling coolers offer the best opportunities. At… More

Integrated Circulator for Regenerative Cryocoolers

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2010 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$99,961.00
Agency / Branch:
DOD / MDA
Principal Investigator:
James Maddocks, Principle Investigator
Abstract:
The problem of cooling gimbaled optics and LWIR focal planes can be solved by placing the entire cryocooler on gimbal. However, a large mass penalty is paid for such configurations, because the gimbal itself must grow in size and mass in order to support the cryocooler. To address the requirements… More

A Heat Switch for Space Applications

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2010 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$99,981.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
James Maddocks, Principal Investigator
Abstract:
Various planned NASA missions require heat switches for active thermal control. As an example cryocoolers, including redundant coolers are incorporated on select missions. The redundant coolers operate when deteriorating or defunct coolers are deactivated. However, integration of redundant coolers… More

Regenerators for Liquid Hydrogen Cryocoolers

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2010 / SBIR / Phase II
Award Amount:
$599,946.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
James R. Maddocks, Principal Investigator
Abstract:
Future NASA exloration, planetary and astrophysics missions will require various enhancements in multi-stage cryocoolers. These include increased efficiency, reduced vibration and reductions in overall system mass and power consumption. For the small coolers required, pulse tube and Stirling coolers… More

A Cold Cycle Dilution Refrigerator for Space Applications

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2011 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$99,942.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
james Maddocks, Principal Investigator
Abstract:
The cold cycle dilution refrigerator is a continuous refrigerator capable of cooling to temperatures below 100 mK that makes use of a novel thermal magnetic pump. The refrigerator will provide continuous cooling at temperatures below 100 mK. This technology will provide cooling for detectors on… More

A Flight-like Integrated Circulator for Broad Area Cooling

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2011 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$99,983.00
Agency:
NASA
Principal Investigator:
James Maddocks, Principal Investigator
Abstract:
Future instruments and platforms for NASA space applications will require increasingly sophisticated thermal control technology, and cryogenic applications will become increasingly more common. For example, the Single Aperture Far-IR (SAFIR) telescope and other cryogenic telescope missions must… More