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A Filter to Remove HMGB1

Award Information

Agency:
Department of Health and Human Services
Branch:
N/A
Award ID:
93822
Program Year/Program:
2009 / SBIR
Agency Tracking Number:
GM086997
Solicitation Year:
N/A
Solicitation Topic Code:
N/A
Solicitation Number:
N/A
Small Business Information
CIRCULATORY TECHNOLOGY, INC.
21 SINGWORTH ST OYSTER BAY, NY 11771-
View profile »
Woman-Owned: No
Minority-Owned: No
HUBZone-Owned: No
 
Phase 1
Fiscal Year: 2009
Title: A Filter to Remove HMGB1
Agency: HHS
Contract: 1R43GM086997-01
Award Amount: $116,223.00
 

Abstract:

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Sepsis, a clinical syndrome associated with infection, is a major complication that can develop after surgery or trauma. It affects roughly 700,000 patients annually with an associated annual cost of 16.7 billion. Sept ic patients can develop multiple organ failure and face significant morbidity and mortality despite advances in intensive care and advanced supportive treatments. There is only one FDA approved treatment for sepsis, activated protein C, but it is minimally effective and approved for use only in a subset of patients with severe sepsis. The pathogenesis of severe sepsis is not well understood. We identified that high levels of HMGB1 are produced in humans and animals with sepsis, and neutralization of HMGB1 i s significantly protective. Our previous studies have demonstrated that inhibiting HMGB1 after induction of sepsis significantly rescues animals from death, even when the treatment begins 24 hours after surgery. These results suggest that HMGB1 can be targ eted to therapeutic advantage in a potentially relevant time frame (24 hours) during sepsis and that its removal should reduce the severity of the inflammatory cascade and improve patient outcome. We propose to bring to the clinical market an extracorporea l system that removes HMGB1 protein from the plasma of septic patients unresponsive to standard treatment. The key to the system is a filter that selectively removes HMGB1 protein from the plasma. Should that be successful, then the use of the filter would easily adapt to already present dialysis hardware systems as well as most of the disposables used for dialysis. Only the dialyzer would be modified and perhaps, the easy to adjust, flow conditions. The presence of such a large base of systems in the healt h centers and that health providers are comfortable using, would allow a proven filter to be readily accepted into clinical use without the need for capital expenditure. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE Sepsis affects roughly 700,000 patients annually, is the 10th leading cause of death overall in the United States, its incidence is rising and its annual cost is over 17 billion. We propose to bring to the clinical market a filter that removes High-Mobility Group B1 (HMGB1), a cellular protein associated with incre ased lethality of septic patients.

Principal Investigator:

Yehuda Tamari
5166242424
CIRTEC@AOL.COM

Business Contact:

Yehuda Tamari
Small Business Information at Submission:

CIRCULATORY TECHNOLOGY, INC.
CIRCULATORY TECHNOLOGY, INC. 21 SINGWORTH ST OYSTER BAY, NY 11771

EIN/Tax ID: 112429114
DUNS: N/A
Number of Employees: N/A
Woman-Owned: No
Minority-Owned: No
HUBZone-Owned: No