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Micro-patterned surfaces for reducing the risk of catheter-associated UTI

Award Information

Agency:
Department of Health and Human Services
Branch:
N/A
Award ID:
93716
Program Year/Program:
2009 / SBIR
Agency Tracking Number:
DK084590
Solicitation Year:
N/A
Solicitation Topic Code:
N/A
Solicitation Number:
N/A
Small Business Information
SHARKLET TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
12635 E MONTVIEW BLVD, STE 160 AURORA, CO 80045-7301
View profile »
Woman-Owned: No
Minority-Owned: No
HUBZone-Owned: No
 
Phase 1
Fiscal Year: 2009
Title: Micro-patterned surfaces for reducing the risk of catheter-associated UTI
Agency: HHS
Contract: 1R43DK084590-01
Award Amount: $168,404.00
 

Abstract:

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): In the U.S. alone, nearly two million patients acquire a nosocomial infection in the hospital each year, and approximately 100,000 of them die. Nosocomial infections are a leading cause of death in the U.S., and they re sult in major increases in hospital stays, human suffering, and healthcare costs. Nearly half of these infections are associated with the use of a medical device, and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common type of nosocomial i nfection, accounting for over 40% of infections in hospitals and nursing homes. Some 95% of UTIs are associated with urinary catheters, and these catheter-associated UTIs account for an estimated annual hospital cost of more than 400 million. The current paradigm for preventing bacterial UTIs has been to introduce antimicrobial agents to reduce the concentrations of bacteria associated with biofilm formation. However, use of antimicrobial agents leads to resistance patterns that make indwelling catheter in fections more difficult to treat. By coating the catheter, the risk of infection is reduced; however, this strategy at best only delays the infection onset. Despite advances in prophylactic strategies, there are currently no definitive methods to prevent c atheter-associated UTI. Sharklet Technologies therefore proposes development of a novel catheter design capable of sustained inhibition of bacterial biofilm formation that does not rely on traditional antimicrobial coatings or treatments. Preliminary studi es have shown that micro-patterns on polymer surfaces can be designed to inhibit bacterial biofilm growth-with the Sharklet micro-pattern being the most effective. Therefore, the overall goal of this project is to develop, validate, and commercialize the use of the Sharklet microscopic pattern (based on the unique antifouling characteristics of shark skin) to inhibit bacterial biofilm formation on urinary catheters without the use of antimicrobial agents. The Specific Aims for proposes development of a nov el catheter design capable of sustained inhibition of bacterial biofilm formation that does not rely on traditional antimicrobial coatings or treatments. proposes development of a novel catheter design capable of sustained inhibition of bacterial biofilm f ormation that does not rely on traditional antimicrobial coatings or treatments. proposes development of a novel catheter design capable of sustained inhibition of bacterial biofilm formation that does not rely on traditional antimicrobial coatings or trea tments. Phase I are 1) to validate the effectiveness of the Sharklet micro-patterned polymer surface for inhibiting biofilm formation with uropathogenic E. coli in growth media and artificial urine over the course of 14 days, and 2) to prove the feasibilit y of fabricating catheter-like prototypes that exhibit Sharklet-patterned extraluminal and intraluminal surfaces. Phase I success will validate the use of micro- patterned surfaces to prevent biofilm growth of a uropathogen and will demonstrate the feasibi lity of constructing a catheter-like prototype exhibiting the pattern. A follow-on Phase II project will be designed to develop manufacturing methods for the tube prototypes and to demonstrate efficacy with an in vivo pig model. The Phase I and Phase II SB IR data will be essential in attracting the types of Phase III private-sector investors and/or strategic partners with whom we are already discussing this technology. Phase III commercialization efforts will therefore be focused on establishing partnersh ips with medical device partners and distributors-particularly those in the urinary catheter markets. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: Some 30 million urinary catheters are inserted into 5 million patients in the U.S. each year, and each one of those patients is a t risk for acquiring a urinary tract infection due to the bacterial biofilms that form on the catheter surface. Current strategies for inhibiting biofilm formation on the catheter surfaces are expensive, ineffective, and give rise to serious complications such as toxic side-effects and multi-drug resistance. The overall goal of this project is to develop, validate, and commercialize the use of the Sharklet microscopic pattern (based on the unique antifouling characteristics of shark skin) to inhibit bacteri al biofilm formation on urinary catheters without the use of antimicrobial agents.

Principal Investigator:

Shravanthi Reddy

Business Contact:


sreddy@sharklet.com
Small Business Information at Submission:

SHARKLET TECHNOLOGIES, LLC
SHARKLET TECHNOLOGIES, LLC BOX 1799 ALACHUA, FL 32616

EIN/Tax ID: 126438560
DUNS: N/A
Number of Employees: N/A
Woman-Owned: No
Minority-Owned: No
HUBZone-Owned: No