USA flag logo/image

An Official Website of the United States Government

SBIR Phase I: Develop a Diagnostic Test for Direct Detection of Mycobacterium…

Award Information

Agency:
National Science Foundation
Branch:
N/A
Award ID:
79492
Program Year/Program:
2006 / SBIR
Agency Tracking Number:
0611282
Solicitation Year:
N/A
Solicitation Topic Code:
N/A
Solicitation Number:
N/A
Small Business Information
GeneSeek
4711 Innovation Drive Lincoln, NE 68521 0539
View profile »
Woman-Owned: No
Minority-Owned: No
HUBZone-Owned: No
 
Phase 1
Fiscal Year: 2006
Title: SBIR Phase I: Develop a Diagnostic Test for Direct Detection of Mycobacterium Avium Subsp. Paratuberculosis
Agency: NSF
Contract: 0611282
Award Amount: $78,725.00
 

Abstract:

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I research project will develop a novel diagnostic test to detect Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). MAP is the causative agent of Johnes disease in cattle and, possibly, of human Crohns disease. A novel approach of early and direct MAP detection is proposed, targeting primarily thevsample matrix blood employing a novel detection system using the near-infrared spectrum to achieve superior sensitivity of testing. This would facilitate testing of cattle and also milk intended for human consumption, the potential transmission vehicle in Crohns disease. The hypothesis is that during the early pathogenesis of Johnes disease of cattle, there is a bacteremia that will allow detection of the causative agent in the blood. If proven true, it is expected that this approach will lead to a new test that may be used widely in the context of state or national animal health or human food safety programs.

Principal Investigator:

Susanne Hinkley
Dr
4024350665
shinkley@geneseek.com

Business Contact:

Susanne Hinkley
Dr
4024350665
shinkley@geneseek.com
Small Business Information at Submission:

GeneSeek
4711 Innovation Drive Lincoln, NE 68521

EIN/Tax ID:
DUNS: N/A
Number of Employees:
Woman-Owned: No
Minority-Owned: No
HUBZone-Owned: No