USA flag logo/image

An Official Website of the United States Government

Adaptive Controls for Aero-Optics Compensation

Award Information

Agency:
Department of Defense
Branch:
Air Force
Award ID:
78865
Program Year/Program:
2006 / SBIR
Agency Tracking Number:
F061-006-1918
Solicitation Year:
N/A
Solicitation Topic Code:
N/A
Solicitation Number:
N/A
Small Business Information
MZA Associates Corporation
2021 Girard SE Suite 150 Albuquerque, NM -
View profile »
Woman-Owned: No
Minority-Owned: No
HUBZone-Owned: No
 
Phase 1
Fiscal Year: 2006
Title: Adaptive Controls for Aero-Optics Compensation
Agency / Branch: DOD / USAF
Contract: FA9451-06-M-0128
Award Amount: $99,963.00
 

Abstract:

MZA has teamed with Prof. Steve Gibson of UCLA to propose the development of adaptive wavefront reconstruction and jitter control techniques for the robust, high-bandwidth compensation of aero-optical effects. Through his work with AFRL, HEL JTO, and AFOSR, Prof. Gibson is on the forefront of adaptive control applied to atmospheric turbulence compensation. High-fidelity wave-optics simulations have shown that adaptive control techniques can provide a factor of two increase in effective closed-loop bandwidth over the standard atmospheric turbulence control technique without having to increase sampling frequency of the wavefront sensor (WFS). The nature of the aero-optic disturbance leads us to believe that the aero-optic disturbance is an ideal candidate for adaptive compensation. In this proposal, we lay out a plan to tailor adaptive control techniques to the aero-optics problem and to design an effective demonstration of the resulting technology.

Principal Investigator:

Matthew Whiteley
Vice President Dayton Operations
9374326560
whiteley@mza.com

Business Contact:

Robert W. Praus, II
President
5052459970
praus@mza.com
Small Business Information at Submission:

MZA ASSOC. CORP.
2021 Girard SE, Suite 150 Albuquerque, NM 87106

EIN/Tax ID: 850400557
DUNS: N/A
Number of Employees:
Woman-Owned: No
Minority-Owned: No
HUBZone-Owned: No