USA flag logo/image

An Official Website of the United States Government

Computerized Stage-Matched Intervention for Juvenile Offenders

Award Information

Agency:
Department of Health and Human Services
Branch:
N/A
Award ID:
93620
Program Year/Program:
2009 / SBIR
Agency Tracking Number:
DA024900
Solicitation Year:
N/A
Solicitation Topic Code:
N/A
Solicitation Number:
N/A
Small Business Information
PRO-CHANGE BEHAVIOR SYSTEMS, INC.
1174 Kingstown Road Unit 101 South Kingstown, RI -
View profile »
Woman-Owned: No
Minority-Owned: No
HUBZone-Owned: No
 
Phase 1
Fiscal Year: 2009
Title: Computerized Stage-Matched Intervention for Juvenile Offenders
Agency: HHS
Contract: 1R43DA024900-01A1
Award Amount: $172,781.00
 

Abstract:

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Juvenile crime imposes enormous costs on victims, on society, and on juvenile offenders themselves. However, research assessing the efficacy of interventions for young offenders show, on average, only small effects on r ecidivism, substance abuse, and other behavioral outcomes. A major problem with existing interventions is that they tend to neglect individual differences in motivation and readiness to make positive changes. We propose to use an empirically validated mode l of behavior change, the Transtheoretical Model (TTM), and expert system technology to develop a computerized intervention designed as an adjunct to traditional juvenile justice programs. The intervention will deliver assessments and individualized feedba ck matched to readiness to stay out of trouble with the law and reduce substance use. It will also generate counselor reports that summarize the youth's feedback and present concrete, easy-to-implement strategies counselors can use to reinforce stage-match ed concepts. The goals of this Phase I project are to develop and validate TTM measures for reducing marijuana and alcohol use among juvenile offenders (to supplement measures already developed for staying out of trouble with the law); to develop the basel ine portion of a computer-administered, interactive, multimedia expert system program; and to test the feasibility of this approach to intervention. Juvenile offenders will participate in focus groups to generate ideas for the TTM measures (n=32) and to pr ovide feedback on the intervention materials (n=32); cognitive interviews to ensure TTM instructions and questions are interpreted as intended (n=8); usability tests to ensure that the expert system intervention is easily navigable and provides a coherent intervention experience (n=8); and an anonymous survey for measure development and validation (n=200). Finally, 60 court- and system-involved youth will participate in a feasibility trial and receive the intervention; their counselors will receive the coun selor reports. The feasibility of this approach will be established if: 1) we are able to deliver the intervention as planned to at least 90 percent of trial participants in a range of juvenile justice programs and settings; 2) participants provide positiv e ratings of the acceptability and usefulness of the interactive session; 3) counselors provide positive ratings of the helpfulness of the counselor reports; and 4) the intervention yields statistically significant pre-post changes on proximal measures of change-namely, youths' assessments of the benefits of staying out of trouble with the law, and the benefits of reducing substance use. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: Juvenile crime imposes enormous costs on victims, on society, and on juvenile offenders themselv es. We propose to use an empirically validated model of behavior change, the Transtheoretical Model (TTM), and expert system technology to develop a computerized intervention designed as an adjunct to traditional juvenile justice programs. The intervention , which delivers assessments, individualized feedback, and counselor reports matched to youths' readiness to stay out of trouble with the law and reduce substance use, has the potential to increase programs' responsivity to youths' needs; make more efficie nt use of scarce program resources; and improve outcomes.

Principal Investigator:

Deborah A. Levesque
4018744106
DLEVESQUE@PROCHANGE.COM

Business Contact:

Janice M. Prochaska
jpadula@prochange.com
Small Business Information at Submission:

PRO-CHANGE BEHAVIOR SYSTEMS, INC.
P.O. BOX 755 WEST KINGSTON, RI 02892

EIN/Tax ID: 050508853
DUNS: N/A
Number of Employees: N/A
Woman-Owned: No
Minority-Owned: No
HUBZone-Owned: No