USA flag logo/image

An Official Website of the United States Government

DoD 2013.1 SBIR Solicitation

Agency: Department of Defense
Branch: Special Operations Command
Program/Year: SBIR / 2013
Solicitation Number: 2013.1
Release Date: November 16, 2012
Open Date: December 17, 2012
Close Date: January 16, 2013
SOCOM13-001: Nano-scale Coatings for the Protection of Electronics and Sensitive Equipment in Marine Environments
Description: OBJECTIVE: Research and development of nano-scale coatings for protection of electronics and other sensitive items from seawater and salt fog. DESCRIPTION: Marine (seawater) environments are harsh on equipment, particularly electronics with seawater"s high conductivity leading to short circuits and increased corrosion rates. Typically, electronics and other items that are susceptible to seawater damage are physically isolated in bags, hard containers or with waterproof conformal coatings, such as silicone, epoxy or urethane. Containers are bulky and interfere with equipment use, while conformal coatings add significant thickness and impede heat transfer. Furthermore, existing seawater isolation methods also interfere with the interconnectivity of different electronic assemblies. Containers and bags must be designed to accept additional assemblies and conformal coatings often add high contact resistance and are too thick to accept a connector. Because of this, connection points are often left uncoated and serve as failure points. Significant numbers of expensive electronic equipment are ruined/damaged each year because of container failure or inadvertent wetting during operations. This increases operational costs and risks mission failure due to inoperable radios, etc. Protective waterproof coatings are already being sold in the commercial market (primarily cell phone market) as an after market product but these are limited in depth and duration. Additionally, Special Warfare divers may be required to transport electronics underwater. For this reason, the coating must be capable of protecting equipment for long durations and at depth during an underwater traverse. Superhydrophobic nano-scale coatings have shown potential for protection of water-susceptible equipment such as electronics. Superhydrophobicity is defined as having a contact angle of greater than 150 degrees, which has been demonstrated through the use of coatings with nano-scale geometric surface modification and/or surface chemical functionalization. There are several challenges associated with the application of these coatings: adhesion with various substrates, mechanical durability (scratching, peeling, crushing of the geometric features), coating uniformity over complex geometries, economical feasibility of the application process, and allowing for the connection of different electronic assemblies without compromising the seawater resistance. Functionally, the seawater environment also presents many challenges. For example, coatings must possess low electrical conductivity to prevent short-circuiting, high thermal conductivity to dissipate heat, and not break down during extended exposure to underwater hydrostatic pressure. PHASE I: Thoroughly evaluate existing nano-scale water protection coating technologies and identify promising options to pursue in both salt and fresh water. Conduct a feasibility study to predict coating performance as it relates to the number of hours a piece of protected electronics equipment could be submerged at depths ranging from 0 to 100 meters before coating failure. Develop a detailed development plan for the most promising coating technology(ies) that includes materials, application methods and evaluation tests. The objective of this USSOCOM Phase I SBIR effort is to conduct and document the results of a thorough feasibility study to investigate what is in the art of the possible within the given trade space that will satisfy a needed technology. The feasibility study should investigate all known options that meet or exceed the minimum performance parameters specified in the Phase I topic write-up. It should also address the risks and potential payoffs of the innovative technology options that are investigated and recommend the option that best achieves the objective of this technology pursuit. The funds obligated on the resulting Phase I SBIR contracts are to be used for the sole purpose of conducting a thorough and comprehensive feasibility study using scientific experiments and laboratory studies as necessary. Operational prototypes will not be developed with USSOCOM SBIR funds during Phase I feasibility studies. Operational prototypes developed with other than SBIR funds that are provided at the end of Phase I feasibility studies will not be considered in deciding what firm(s) will be invited to Phase II. All offerors shall include as part of the Phase I proposal the transportation costs for two round trips to travel to Tampa, Florida, for two separate meetings. The first travel requirement shall be the Phase I Kick-Off meeting and the second travel requirement shall be for the Phase I Out-Brief meeting. The Principal Investigator and all other representatives needed to discuss the offeror's technology pursuit shall attend the Phase I Kick-Off and Out-Brief meetings. PHASE II: Develop promising coating technology and demonstrate the coating at a laboratory level, considering environmental variables that may be encountered in service, such as temperature, salinity and pressure. Examine and characterize the coating and application method(s) through appropriate testing methods. Design and develop prototype systems based on the best design evaluated by Phase I. Evaluate the effectiveness of the coating for the prototype systems under environmental conditions to include: environment pressurized to 90 psi seawater environment to 100 meters water temperatures between 32-95 degrees F PHASE III DUAL USE APLICATIONS: Refine and mature coating process based on Phase II testing results. Demonstrate the coating on complex electronics and materials that are representative of those to be seen in the field. Conduct and report testing to evaluate coating performance and durability, considering appropriate environmental variables such as temperature, salinity and pressure. This technology is applicable to the commercial electronics industry, where water protection could be useful (cell phones, radios and other consumer electronics). Furthermore, this manner of water protection may also be applied to a variety of different substrates. REFERENCES: 1. Chinn, J.; Helmrich, F.; Guenther, R.; Wiltse, M.; Hurst, K.; and Ashurst, W."Durable Super-hydrophic Nano-composite Films. NSTI-Nanotech 2010; 1: 612-615. 2. Brinker, C.J.; Branson, E.; Kissel, D.J.; Cook, A.; and Singh, S."Superhyrophobic Coating". 2008 R & D 100 award entry form, Sandia National Laboratories. 3. Branson et al."Preparation of Hydrophobic Coatings". US patent 7485343, 2009. 4. Zhai et al."Superhydrophobic Coatings". US patent 2006/0029808, 2006. 5. Doshi, D.A.; Shah, P.B.; Singh, S.; Branson, E.D.; Malanoski, A.P.; Watkins, E.B.; Majewski, J.;van Swol, F.; and Brinker, C.J."Investigating the Interface of Superhydrophobic Surfaces in Contact with Water". Langmuir 2005; 21: 7805-7811.
SOCOM13-002: Over the Horizon Underwater Communications
Description: OBJECTIVE: Communicate from a minimum depth of three (3) meters underwater to overhead SATCOM receiver. DESCRIPTION: Most maritime Tagging, Tracking, and Locating devices operate using acoustic sensors or need to break the surface of the water to communicate. Acoustic devices produce a detectable acoustic signature and are limited on the range between the tracking device and the receiver. Tracking devices that require being above the surface to communicate present a visual indicator of the tracking operation. The focus of this SBIR topic is to develop the capability to make a data link from below the surface of the water to communicate with an overhead SATCOM receiver in near real time. PHASE I: Conduct a feasibility study to develop an underwater tracking device capable of tracking and transmitting in near real time the location, speed, and heading of the device without breaking the surface of the water. The objective of the Phase I feasibility study is to determine what is in the art of the possible to maximize the following performance parameters realizing that only the minimum performance requirements are specified: a. Communicate from a minimum depth of 3 meters underwater to an overhead SATCOM receiver in the 1616-1626 MHz, L-Band range b. Operate unattended for a minimum of 30 days communicating with satellites in a low earth orbit transmitting and receiving at least once a day c. Transmit and receive a minimum of 250 bytes per Short Burst Data data message at a minimum of 2.2 Kbit/s d. Minimum size is 6"x4"x1"e. Operate in both salt and fresh water environments The objective of this USSOCOM Phase I SBIR effort is to conduct and document the results of a thorough feasibility study to investigate what is in the art of the possible within the given trade space that will satisfy a needed technology. The feasibility study should investigate all known options that meet or exceed the minimum performance parameters specified in the Phase I topic write-up. It should also address the risks and potential payoffs of the innovative technology options that are investigated and recommend the option that best achieves the objective of this technology pursuit. The funds obligated on the resulting Phase I SBIR contracts are to be used for the sole purpose of conducting a thorough and comprehensive feasibility study using scientific experiments and laboratory studies as necessary. Operational prototypes will not be developed with USSOCOM SBIR funds during Phase I feasibility studies. Operational prototypes developed with other than SBIR funds that are provided at the end of Phase I feasibility studies will not be considered in deciding what firm(s) will be invited to Phase II. All offerors shall include as part of the Phase I proposal the transportation costs for two round trips to travel to Tampa, Florida, for two separate meetings. The first travel requirement shall be the Phase I Kick-Off meeting and the second travel requirement shall be for the Phase I Out-Brief meeting. The Principal Investigator and all other representatives needed to discuss the offeror's technology pursuit shall attend the Phase I Kick-Off and Out-Brief meetings. PHASE II: Demonstrate a prototype positioned three (3) meters underwater to connect and send data to SATCOM in both salt and fresh water environments at or better than the performance parameters described in Phase I above. PHASE III DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Joint tracking capabilities for Federal and DoD organizations. Commercial underwater communication applications. REFERENCES: None
SOCOM13-003: Advanced Medical Microelectronics for Use in Remote Austere Environments
Description: OBJECTIVE: To combine the capabilities of several medical electronics devices into a single device while maintaining portability and ease of use. DESCRIPTION: Current Special Operations Forces (SOF) advanced medical diagnostic equipment is currently accomplished using multiple devices. The focus of the topic is to develop a small ruggedized system capable of consolidating those capabilities into a single device. PHASE I: The objective of this feasibility study is to determine what is in the art of the possible for the integration of current medical diagnostic capabilities into a single miniaturized device for providing medical care to SOF operators in remote and austere battlefield locations. The device must provide a balance between integrating multiple medical monitoring/diagnostic devices into a single platform that reduces the overall footprint of current technologies on the market today. This could be accomplished through the reduction in overall size, weight, and number of components without sacrificing overall capability. Study considerations include, but should not be limited to, the following capabilities and characteristics: a. Diagnostic Capabilities: (1) Ultrasound (2) Capnography (3) Blood Pressure (non-invasive) (4) Pulse Oximetry (5) Various Lead Electrocardiography Monitoring (6) Defibrillation b. Device Characteristics: (1) Portable (small and light enough for one SOF operator/medic to comfortably carry) i. Dimensions - 10.5"W x 9"H x 8"D maximum (Desired: 10.5"W x 8"H x 4"D or smaller) ii. Weight - 12 lbs. maximum (Desired: 6 lbs. or less) (2) Remote Monitoring of three or more patients i. Simultaneous monitoring of vital signs when combat medic tends to other wounded ii. Within 25 meters or line of sight of the combat medic (3) Operating Time - 7 or more hours of battery life (or alternate power sources) (4) Display - screen size sufficient to discern noticeable indicators of vital signs (4) Interoperability with SOF field computing devices (5) Feasibility of a single device; i.e., If impractical, provide a trade off analysis of logical combinations of capabilities in one, or more, device(s). The objective of this USSOCOM Phase I SBIR effort is to conduct and document the results of a thorough feasibility study to investigate what is in the art of the possible within the given trade space that will satisfy a needed technology. The feasibility study should investigate all known options that meet or exceed the minimum performance parameters specified in the Phase I topic write-up. It should also address the risks and potential payoffs of the innovative technology options that are investigated and recommend the option that best achieves the objective of this technology pursuit. The funds obligated on the resulting Phase I SBIR contracts are to be used for the sole purpose of conducting a thorough and comprehensive feasibility study using scientific experiments and laboratory studies as necessary. Operational prototypes will not be developed with USSOCOM SBIR funds during Phase I feasibility studies. Operational prototypes developed with other than SBIR funds that are provided at the end of Phase I feasibility studies will not be considered in deciding what firm(s) will be invited to Phase II. PHASE II: During Phase II a standalone micronized electronic monitoring prototype system will be optimized based on the results of the Phase I feasibility assessment. Provide a prototype to demonstrate that the performance parameters and other characteristics listed in Phase I above can be integrated into a fully functional single device or multiple devices if necessary. The Phase II effort will also include ruggedizing the prototype system while maintaining a lightweight and small form factor. PHASE III DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Commercial applications in the area of micronized advanced monitoring capabilities are anticipated. Other industrial and protection services in the Homeland Security arena (i.e. first responders) are expected to benefit from these advances. The development of such capabilities could impact the overall medical field through implementation in triage and emergency room settings. This phase will align with consumer product markets and industrial protective services for commercial variants of the advanced monitoring system. At the completion of this phase, the system shall be capable of being tested in a simulated operational environment. REFERENCES: None
SOCOM13-004: Next Generation Portable Power Amplifier
Description: OBJECTIVE: Develop a next generation light-weight, high-efficiency, man-portable power amplifier for communications. DESCRIPTION: Special Operations Forces (SOF) currently must carry multiple power amplifiers and associated batteries for all required communications equipment to conduct their missions. These portable power amplifiers and batteries add weight, heat, and bulk to an already burdened SOF operator. Technology advances have realized incremental improvements in each of these three factors but an ideal innovative solution that considers all three factors as a group has not been pursued. The purpose of this technology pursuit is to accelerate the reduction of weight; heat and bulk SOF carry by developing an integrated portable power amplifier and battery pack as a system of integrated components. PHASE I: Conduct a feasibility study to reduce weight, heat and bulk SOF warfighters currently carry by developing an integrated portable power amplifier and battery pack system that meets or exceeds the following minimum performance requirements. The objective of the Phase I feasibility study is to determine what is in the art of the possible to maximize the performance parameters realizing that only the minimum performance parameters or minimum performance ranges are specified: a. 2-20 watt selectable transmit power b. 30-3000 MHz frequency range c. Overall weight of 2.5 pounds or less d. 24 hour or greater operational life on a single charge e. Compatible with most (if not all) field communications equipment used by SOF teams f. Desired solution should be modular and require no external cooling provisions g. MIL-STD-810G entitled"Environmental Engineering Considerations and Laboratory Tests"h. MIL-STD-461F entitled"Requirements for the Control of Electromagnetic Interference Characteristics of Subsystems and Equipment"i. Sealed and weather resistant j. Standard 50 ohm Threaded Neill-Concelman (TNC) and Subminiature version A (SMA) connectors Below are representative examples of radios/interfaces the portable power amplifier should support: - Thales AN/PRC-148 MBITR - Thales AN/PRC-152 - Harris RF5800 - SINCGARS/HAVEQUICK support Below is a current system with similar capabilities that the portable power amplifier should support: - AMTI A-320 20W Amplifier (30-512 MHz only) Perform an analysis of the tradeoffs in terms of size, weight, power, heat, and battery life of the entire integrated power amplifier and battery pack system. The objective of this USSOCOM Phase I SBIR effort is to conduct and document the results of a thorough feasibility study to investigate what is in the art of the possible within the given trade space that will satisfy a needed technology. The feasibility study should investigate all known options that meet or exceed the minimum performance parameters specified in the Phase I topic write-up. It should also address the risks and potential payoffs of the innovative technology options that are investigated and recommend the option that best achieves the objective of this technology pursuit. The funds obligated on the resulting Phase I SBIR contracts are to be used for the sole purpose of conducting a thorough and comprehensive feasibility study using scientific experiments and laboratory studies as necessary. Operational prototypes will not be developed with USSOCOM SBIR funds during Phase I feasibility studies. Operational prototypes developed with other than SBIR funds that are provided at the end of Phase I feasibility studies will not be considered in deciding what firm(s) will be invited to Phase II. All offerors shall include as part of the Phase I proposal the transportation costs for two round trips to travel to Tampa, Florida, for two separate meetings. The first travel requirement shall be the Phase I Kick-Off meeting and the second travel requirement shall be for the Phase I Out-Brief meeting. The Principal Investigator and all other representatives needed to discuss the offeror's technology pursuit shall attend the Phase I Kick-Off and Out-Brief meetings. PHASE II: Develop a prototype system that integrates both the power amplifier and batteries into a modular package. Demonstrate the performance characteristics of the system on several common field radios used by SOF teams. PHASE III DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Commercial portable communications applications. REFERENCES: 1. MIL-STD-810G entitled"Environmental Engineering Considerations and Laboratory Tests"dated 31 October 2008 2. MIL-STD-461F entitled"Requirements for the Control of Electromagnetic Interference Characteristics of Subsystems and Equipment"dated 10 December 2007
SOCOM13-005: Family of Sub-Sonic Ammunition
Description: OBJECTIVE: Develop a family of sub-sonic ammunition that has extremely tight velocity standard deviations, is clean burning, will function in gas operated weapons and will be cost effective. Successful completion of this SBIR technology pursuit will improve the survivability of Special Operations Forces during covert operations. DESCRIPTION: Sub-Sonic ammunition has been in use since WWII and functions well in small caliber suppressed pistols only. Current rifle rounds of sub-sonic design experience many problems. First, they are not overly accurate due to large standard deviations in velocity from using a full sized cartridge case with a dramatically reduced propellant charge and a very heavy bullet. Second, the reduced propellant charge makes it hard to get a clean burn of the propellant making the ammunition dirty and rapidly fouling the weapon. Third, no current sub-sonic rifle round will consistently cycle the action on gas operated weapons. In the past, no viable solution existed for sub-sonic ammunition but new technologies such as polymer cased ammunition may provide viable solutions. For example, polymer can be formed to tailor the internal volume of the case to the propellant needed to achieve the desired sub-sonic velocities while generating a complete burn of the propellant. Polymer can also reduce shot to shot velocity standard deviations and, thereby, improve accuracy. Resolving the internal volume issue with a subsonic round should also produce adequate port pressure to function a gas operated weapon. PHASE I: Conduct a feasibility study to determine if a sub-sonic concept/capability can be achieved for the 5.56mm, 7.62mm, and .338 caliber rounds. The feasibility study should determine if the following minimum performance parameters can be achieved and exceeded. The feasibility study should determine what is in the art of the possible that will maximize the following performance parameters realizing that only the minimum performance parameters are specified. The sub-sonic round must-- a. hold a velocity standard deviation of 14 or less. b. be clean burning. c. be flash suppressed to where, in a suppressed weapon, no flash is visible. d. provide as a minimum 40 decibel reduction in sound from full velocity ammunition in a suppressed weapon. e. have no greater than a threshold of 30 Feet Per Second (FPS) shift in velocity from lot to lot while in production with an objective of 15 FPS shift. f. maintain accuracy of 1.25 Minute of Angle (MOA) out to 300 yards with no singled shot group exceeding 1.5 MOA for a total 10 ten shot groups (5 groups fired through 2 different weapons). g. stay sub-sonic at all temperature extremes and functions in all USSOCOM weapons in that caliber. h. be similar in cost to the other quality ammunition for each of the respective calibers. The objective of this USSOCOM Phase I SBIR effort is to conduct and document the results of a thorough feasibility study to investigate what is in the art of the possible within the given trade space that will satisfy a needed technology. The feasibility study should investigate all known options that meet or exceed the minimum performance parameters specified in the Phase I topic write-up. It should also address the risks and potential payoffs of the innovative technology options that are investigated and recommend the option that best achieves the objective of this technology pursuit. The funds obligated on the resulting Phase I SBIR contracts are to be used for the sole purpose of conducting a thorough and comprehensive feasibility study using scientific experiments and laboratory studies as necessary. Operational prototypes will not be developed with USSOCOM SBIR funds during Phase I feasibility studies. Operational prototypes developed with other than SBIR funds that are provided at the end of Phase I feasibility studies will not be considered in deciding what firm(s) will be invited to Phase II. PHASE II: Demonstrate sub-sonic 5.56mm, 7.62mm, and .338 caliber round prototypes to meet the performance parameters determined to be achievable during the Phase I feasibility study. PHASE III DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Other Department of Defense Components, Law Enforcement, Department of Homeland Security, Special Weapons and Tactics Teams REFERENCES: None
SOCOM13-006: .50 Caliber Light Weight Precision Ammunition
Description: OBJECTIVE: Design, develop, and demonstrate an innovative .50 caliber round that is lighter than the current .50 caliber ammunition that users of MK-15 and M107 weapons must carry, that improves the accuracy over the current brass cased Department of Defense Identification Code A606 round using the MK-211 projectile, and to develop a balistically matched non-dud producing training round to allow personnel improve their sniper skills on scored ranges. DESCRIPTION: The A606 round is the current round of choice for sniper operations using the M107 or MK-15 weapons platforms. The A606 round was designed as an anti-materiel munitions, is not overly accurate, and is heavy (every two rounds weigh approximately a pound). (For example, the M107 weighs 36 pounds and 50 rounds of ammunition weigh 25 additional pounds for a total of 61 pounds). Additionally, USSOCOM needs a more accurate MK-211 like round that is non dud producing so that it can be fired on normal sniper ranges to improve shooting skills on one of the most difficult weapons platforms to employ due to the extreme long ranges the weapons are designed to engage. PHASE I: Conduct a feasibility study to determine if a MK-211 like round (both dud and non dud training variant) can meet or exceed the following minimum performance improvements of the current A606 round. The objective of the Phase I feasibility study is to determine what is in the art of the possible to maximize the following performance improvements realizing that only the minimum performance improvements are specified: a. Reduce the weight by a minimum of 20%. b. Improve accuracy to a minimum of 1.25 Minute of Angle. c. Meet all applicable safety requirements in temperatures ranging from -40 degrees F to + 165 degrees F. d. Realize a cost per round in full rate production to be not greater than 10% of the cost of the existing A606 MK-211 round. The training round should achieve the ballistic match to the improved MK-211 round allowing users to dramatically improve their skills with .50 caliber weapons platforms by allowing use on a non-dud producing range. The objective of this USSOCOM Phase I SBIR effort is to conduct and document the results of a thorough feasibility study to investigate what is in the art of the possible within the given trade space that will satisfy a needed technology. The feasibility study should investigate all known options that meet or exceed the minimum performance parameters specified in the Phase I topic write-up. It should also address the risks and potential payoffs of the innovative technology options that are investigated and recommend the option that best achieves the objective of this technology pursuit. The funds obligated on the resulting Phase I SBIR contracts are to be used for the sole purpose of conducting a thorough and comprehensive feasibility study using scientific experiments and laboratory studies as necessary. Operational prototypes will not be developed with USSOCOM SBIR funds during Phase I feasibility studies. Operational prototypes developed with other than SBIR funds that are provided at the end of Phase I feasibility studies will not be considered in deciding what firm(s) will be invited to Phase II. PHASE II: Design and demonstrate dud and non dud MK-211 like round prototypes to meet the performance characteristics determined to be achievable as the result of the Phase I feasibility study. PHASE III DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Services, other Department of Defense Components, Law Enforcement, Department of Homeland Security, Special Weapons and Tactics Teams REFERENCES: None
SOCOM13-007: Portable High Performance Computing and Storage
Description: OBJECTIVE: Develop a light-weight, low-power man-portable, integrated, non-volatile memory storage and computation device. DESCRIPTION: Traditional and Special Operations Forces (SOF) multi-intelligence collection and analysis activities require the storage and processing of large quantities of data, often in the Terabyte (TB) range. Traditional means of storing and processing the data involve either large, stationary computation and storage devices with correspondingly high power and cooling requirements, or a fast and reliable communications link to an off-site location. Highly mobile activities often lack such resources. Technologies that exist today include Solid State Drives with capacities in the 1TB range and Graphics Processing Units (GPU) capable of 2 TeraFLOPS (Floating-Point Operations Per Second) and programmable for general purpose as well as scientific computing. Neither technology is suitable as-is due to size or power requirements. Additionally, there is currently no integrated product that combines high capacity non-volatile memory storage with high performance general purpose and scientific computing capabilities in a low-power, man-portable package. PHASE I: Conduct a feasibility study to develop a single device that can meet or exceed the following minimum performance parameters. The objective of this feasibility study is to determine what is in the art of the possible to develop and integrate the following storage and computational components into single or modular device: a. 16 Terabyte or greater of non-volatile storage b. 1 TeraFLOPS or more of computational capability c. Consume 12 Watts of power or less d. Battery operated or other power source that is compatible with Size, Weight and Power (SWaP) limitations in a man portable package e. 24 hours or greater operational life on a single charge f. General purpose and scientific computing capabilities g. Man-portable package h. May be modular and stackable i. A standard laptop should be able to access the storage component j. A standard laptop should be able to control and monitor the computational component (but is not an integral part of the processing chain) k. Investigate the possibility of an order of magnitude reduction in size, weight, and power than a typical external 3.5"hard drive l. Investigate reducing thermal signature when compared to current levels of heat generated by computing systems Perform an analysis of the tradeoffs in terms of size, weight, power, battery life of the entire system. The objective of this USSOCOM Phase I SBIR effort is to conduct and document the results of a thorough feasibility study to investigate what is in the art of the possible within the given trade space that will satisfy a needed technology. The feasibility study should investigate all known options that meet or exceed the minimum performance parameters specified in the Phase I topic write-up. It should also address the risks and potential payoffs of the innovative technology options that are investigated and recommend the option that best achieves the objective of this technology pursuit. The funds obligated on the resulting Phase I SBIR contracts are to be used for the sole purpose of conducting a thorough and comprehensive feasibility study using scientific experiments and laboratory studies as necessary. Operational prototypes will not be developed with USSOCOM SBIR funds during Phase I feasibility studies. Operational prototypes developed with other than SBIR funds that are provided at the end of Phase I feasibility studies will not be considered in deciding what firm(s) will be invited to Phase II. All offerors shall include as part of the Phase I proposal the transportation costs for two round trips to travel to Tampa, Florida, for two separate meetings. The first travel requirement shall be the Phase I Kick-Off meeting and the second travel requirement shall be for the Phase I Out-Brief meeting. The Principal Investigator and all other representatives needed to discuss the offeror's technology pursuit shall attend the Phase I Kick-Off and Out-Brief meetings. PHASE II: Develop an integrated prototype system that incorporates both the storage and computational components into a single or modular device. Demonstrate the performance characteristics of the prototype system including the laptop interface on a typical large data processing application. PHASE III DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Commercial applications in data centers, video game consoles, medical, and other scientific fields. REFERENCES: 1. Fusion I/O ioDrive2 Data Sheet, http://www.fusionio.com/data-sheets/iodrive2. 2."PEPSC: A Power-Efficient Processor for Scientific Computing", G Dasika et. al, 20th Intl Conference on Parallel Architectures and Compilation Techniques (PACT), October 2011, http://web.eecs.umich.edu/~tnm/trev_test/papersPDF/2011.10.PEPSC-a%20pow....