USA flag logo/image

An Official Website of the United States Government

Point of Care Attachment of Multiple Antibiotics onto Metal Implants

Award Information

Agency:
Department of Health and Human Services
Branch:
N/A
Award ID:
85546
Program Year/Program:
2007 / SBIR
Agency Tracking Number:
DE018584
Solicitation Year:
N/A
Solicitation Topic Code:
N/A
Solicitation Number:
N/A
Small Business Information
AFFINERGY ,INC
BOX 14650, 617 DAVIS DR STE 100 RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NC -
View profile »
Woman-Owned: No
Minority-Owned: No
HUBZone-Owned: No
 
Phase 1
Fiscal Year: 2007
Title: Point of Care Attachment of Multiple Antibiotics onto Metal Implants
Agency: HHS
Contract: 1R43DE018584-01
Award Amount: $264,107.00
 

Abstract:

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Infection surrounding metal implants is a common and sometimes devastating cause of implant failure in a number of fields including oral, craniomaxillofacial (CMF), orthopedic, and cardiovascular surgery. These infectio ns, which arise from the establishment of biofilms on device surfaces, not only necessitate new surgeries but in themselves present a significant threat to life and limb. The biofilm bacteria that establish themselves on implants are essentially impossible to eradicate by any means except explantation. New technologies that decrease microbial colonization and infection rates associated with metal implants would clearly benefit society. We propose to develop a generalizable peptide coating that will allow a clinician to choose from more than one class of antibiotics to load onto an implant at point of care. Using phage display technology, Affinergy has identified a series of peptides that bind with high affinity to a number of metals, including titanium and s tainless steel. These metal-binding peptides will serve as the basis for engineering an antibiotic binding, peptide coating. The goal of this Phase I SBIR proposal is to validate an Interfacial Biomaterials (IFBM) approach to attach an antibiotic onto me tal implant surfaces to decrease implant colonization. We initially targeted vancomycin for proof of principle because it has a significant amount of structural complexity. This complexity provides a larger chemical space from which a binding peptide c an be found; making the success of phage display panning more likely within a short time frame. In aim 1, we will synthesize candidate peptides that have binding affinity for vancomycin. In aim 2, we will synthesize a series of vancomycin:metal IFBM's. We will verify the stability of these candidate IFBM's in biological fluids, test their ability to bind and retain antibiotics, verify that they do not inhibit osteoblast attachment, and quantify the coating density of peptide and antibiotic on metal surfaces . In aim 3, we will characterize the anti-microbial activity and release kinetics of vancomycin bound and released from peptide coated metal. If successful, Phase II work would involve biopanning of two more antibiotics targets (an aminoglycoside and a tet racycline) commonly used both locally and systemically to prevent or treat implant associated infections. Branched IFBM's containing binding modules for all three classes of antibiotic would be assembled and examined for efficacy in vitro and then in an im plant infection model in vivo. Infection surrounding metal hardware is a common and sometimes devastating cause of implant failure in a number of medical fields including oral, craniomaxillofacial (CMF), orthopedic, and cardiovascular surgery. Arisi ng from the establishment of pathogenic biofilms on device surfaces, these infections not only necessitate new surgeries but in themselves present a significant threat to life and limb. The biofilm bacteria that establish themselves on metal hardware are e ssentially impossible to eradicate by any means except explantation. Methods that decrease infection rates associated with metal implants would clearly benefit society. We propose to develop a generalizable peptide coating that will promote attachment of m ultiple antibiotics at point of care to a wide range of metal implants to decrease microbial colonization on their surfaces and ultimately lower implant infection rates.

Principal Investigator:

Paul T. Hamilton
9194332288
PHAMILTON@AFFINERGY.COM

Business Contact:

Walker A. Cash
jgindes@affinergy.com
Small Business Information at Submission:

AFFINERGY ,INC
PO BOX 14650 RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NC 27709

EIN/Tax ID: 550826074
DUNS: N/A
Number of Employees: N/A
Woman-Owned: No
Minority-Owned: No
HUBZone-Owned: No