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Company Information:

Company Name:
ALKERMES, INC.
Address:
64 SIDNEY ST
CAMBRIDGE, MA 02139
Phone:
(617) 494-0171
URL:
N/A
EIN:
N/A
DUNS:
N/A
Number of Employees:
N/A
Woman-Owned?:
No
Minority-Owned?:
No
HUBZone-Owned?:
No

Commercialization:

Has been acquired/merged with?:
N/A
Has had Spin-off?:
N/A
Has Had IPO?:
N/A
Year of IPO:
N/A
Has Patents?:
N/A
Number of Patents:
N/A
Total Sales to Date $:
$ 0.00
Total Investment to Date $
$ 0.00
POC Title:
N/A
POC Name:
N/A
POC Phone:
N/A
POC Email:
N/A
Narrative:
N/A

Award Totals:

Program/Phase Award Amount ($) Number of Awards
SBIR Phase I $446,968.00 7
SBIR Phase II $2,418,577.00 4

Award List:

DEVELOPMENT OF AN IN VITRO HUMAN BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER

Award Year / Program / Phase:
1990 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$50,000.00
Agency:
HHS
Principal Investigator:
Ruth M Starzyk
Abstract:
N/a

DEVELOPMENT OF AN IN VITRO HUMAN BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER

Award Year / Program / Phase:
1991 / SBIR / Phase II
Award Amount:
$497,474.00
Agency:
HHS
Principal Investigator:
Ruth M Starzyk
Abstract:
This project will develop a working in vitro blood-brain barrier model with endothelial cells isolated from human brain microvasculature. this model will allow rapid assessment of the efficacy of drug delivery systems designedto bring pharmaceutically useful compounds to the brain parenchyma.… More

DELIVERY OF NERVE GROWTH FACTOR TO THE BRAIN

Award Year / Program / Phase:
1991 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$49,200.00
Agency:
HHS
Principal Investigator:
Phillip Friden
Abstract:
N/a

DELIVERY OF NERVE GROWTH FACTOR TO THE BRAIN

Award Year / Program / Phase:
1992 / SBIR / Phase II
Award Amount:
$422,381.00
Agency:
HHS
Principal Investigator:
Phillip Friden
Abstract:
Nerve growth factor (ngf) has been shown in vitro and in vivo to support the growth of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. in alzheimer's disease, these cells undergo significant degenerative changes which may be responsible for the cognitive and memory deficits associated with this disorder.… More

ANTIBODIES THAT REVERSIBLY OPEN THE BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER

Award Year / Program / Phase:
1992 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$49,595.00
Agency:
HHS
Principal Investigator:
Ruth M Starzyk
Abstract:
This research project will develop a monoclonal antibody-based system to reversibly permeabilize the blood-brain barrier (bbb) to blood-borne therapeutics. such antibodies also may serve as carrier molecules to bring therapeutics to the bbb. to this end a naturally occurring receptor on brain… More

Gene Therapy of Midbrain Dopamine Circuits

Award Year / Program / Phase:
1995 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$100,000.00
Agency:
HHS
Principal Investigator:
John Mc Grath
Abstract:
N/a

Gene Therapy of Midbrain Dopamine Circuits

Award Year / Program / Phase:
1997 / SBIR / Phase II
Award Amount:
$748,722.00
Agency:
HHS
Principal Investigator:
John Mc Grath
Abstract:
Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors are to be developed for transgene delivery to thenervous system (CNS). In particular, we are engineering rAAVs designed to transduce an expression cathe human gene for glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). GDNF is a novel member of the… More

N/A

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2000 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$99,193.00
Agency:
HHS
Principal Investigator:
Raymond Bartus
Abstract:
N/a

N/A

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2001 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$0.00
Agency:
HHS
Principal Investigator:
Abstract:
N/a

N/A

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2001 / SBIR / Phase II
Award Amount:
$750,000.00
Agency:
HHS
Principal Investigator:
Abstract:
N/a

Novel, sustained-release naltrexone for opiate abuse

Award Year / Program / Phase:
2001 / SBIR / Phase I
Award Amount:
$98,980.00
Agency:
HHS
Principal Investigator:
Raymond T. Bartus
Abstract:
DESCRIPTION: While opiate agonists can be effective for treating abusers, they are. inappropriate in many circumstances. The opiate antagonist naltrexone (NTX) has been approved by the FDA and endorsed by NIDA and other government agencies as an important treatment… More