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Division of Aging Biology (DAB)

Description:

DAB sponsors research on the physiological, molecular, and cellular causes and consequences of aging processes. DAB also has responsibility for maintaining existing resources and developing new resources for aging research, such as populations of well-characterized animals and specific cell lines including, for example, human fetal lung fibroblasts.

DAB areas of research that may be of interest to small businesses include, but are not limited to:

A. Effects of metabolism on the aging process, e.g., how metabolic regulation influences longevity, and the development of anti-oxidant interventions to reduce oxidative stress in vivo.

Dr. David Finkelstein

301-496-6402, Fax: 301-402-0010

Email: df18s@nih.gov

B. Development of minimally-perturbing techniques for collecting blood from mice, rats, and other animals several times a day in sufficient quantities for measurement of hormone levels and other circulating factors in young and old animals, or development of non-invasive research and test methods for use in animals.

Dr. Nancy Nadon

301-496-6402, Fax: 301-402-0010

Email: nn37a@nih.gov

C. Development of molecular probes such as antibodies, DNA sequences and expression vectors useful in studying aging, senescence, and longevity both in vivo and in vitro.

Dr. Rebecca Fuldner

301-496-6402, Fax: 301-402-0010

Email: Fuldnerr@mail.nih.gov

D. Instruments and/or methodology to monitor dynamic progression of ovarian follicles from primordial through antral stages in humans and other mammals with sufficient sensitivity to obtain an accurate profile during the perimenopausal period when relatively small numbers of follicles are present.

Dr. Felipe Sierra

301-496-6402, Fax: 301-402-0010

Email: sierraf@mail.nih.gov

E. Development of new animal models, including transgenic animals, for studying aging processes, as well as development of new biological model systems for research on aging to replace or reduce vertebrate animal use in research. These models may include better in vitro systems, improved cell culture methods, mathematical models, and computer simulations.

Dr. Mahadev Murthy

301-496-6402, Fax: 301-402-0010

Email: murthy@mail.nih.gov

F. Development of interventions to slow down the degenerative processes associated with aging. These would include techniques with commercial potential to: (1) manipulate the control of cell proliferation or programmed cell death, (2) reduce the level of damage to nucleic acids, proteins and lipids and the macromolecular complexes formed from these molecules, (3) improve the damage surveillance and repair potential of cells, (4) improve the immune response to foreign molecules or reduce the response to self, and (5) reverse age-related changes in hormone production and function.

Dr. Nancy Nadon

301-496-6402, Fax: 301-402-0010

Email: nn37a@nih.gov

G. Development of treatments for wound healing in the aged. These would include devices, processes, and pharmacological agents with the potential to (1) promote would healing in aged tissues such as skin, muscle, cartilage, and bone, or (2) reduce scar formation without compromising effective healing. Wounds produced by accidental damage or resulting from surgery would be appropriate for consideration.

Dr. John Williams

301-496-6402, Fax: 301-402-0010

Email: williamsj6@mail.nih.gov

H. Development of appropriate animal and human culture model systems to explore underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of prostate growth in middle-aged and older subjects.

I. Development of appropriate animal model systems to explore underlying molecular and cellular systems of female reproductive aging processes as well as the development of pathophysiologic processes associated with the human menopause, including bone loss, cardiovascular pathology, hot flashes, and excessive uterine bleeding.

Dr. Rebecca Fuldner

301-496-6402, Fax: 301-402-0010

Email: fuldnerr@mail.nih.gov

or

Dr. Felipe Sierra

301-496-6402, Fax: 301-402-0010

Email: sierraf@mail.nih.gov

J. Development of cell-based therapies or other treatments to repair myocardial or vascular tissues after ischemia. The work should include consideration of age-related effects on the therapy or treatment.

Dr. Ronald Kohanski

301-496-6402, Fax: 301-402-0010

Email: kohanskir@mail.nih.gov

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