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High Frequency Surface Pressure, Shear Stress and Heat Flux Measurements for High Temperature Applications

Award Information
Agency: Department of Defense
Branch: Air Force
Contract: FA9550-07-C-0161
Agency Tracking Number: F074-014-0344
Amount: $100,000.00
Phase: Phase I
Program: STTR
Solicitation Topic Code: AF07-T014
Solicitation Number: N/A
Timeline
Solicitation Year: 2007
Award Year: 2007
Award Start Date (Proposal Award Date): 2007-09-26
Award End Date (Contract End Date): 2008-09-26
Small Business Information
5004 NW 60TH TERRACE
GAINESVILLE, FL 32653
United States
DUNS: 113641695
HUBZone Owned: No
Woman Owned: No
Socially and Economically Disadvantaged: No
Principal Investigator
 MARK SHEPLAK
 VICE PRESIDENT
 (352) 359-7796
 SHEPLAK@UFL.EDU
Business Contact
 MARK SHEPLAK
Title: VICE PRESIDENT
Phone: (352) 359-7796
Email: SHEPLAK@UFL.EDU
Research Institution
 UNIV. OF FLORIDA
 STEPHEN HOROWITZ
 
320 BENTON BLDG. P.O. BOX 116250
GAINESVILLE, FL 32611 6250
United States

 (352) 846-0582
 Nonprofit college or university
Abstract

The goal of the proposed project is to develop a robust, high-bandwidth, micromachined Moiré optical-based shear stress sensor with a remote photo-diode/fiber-optic array optical readout for high-temperature, unsteady high-speed flow measurement applications. The time-accurate, continuous, direct measurement of fluctuating wall shear stress is currently not possible. The realization of this capability not only benefits hypersonic vehicle development but impacts a broad application spectrum that ranges from fundamental scientific research to industrial process control, biomedical applications, etc. The proposed sensor consists of a miniature floating element sensor possessing process producing optical gratings on the backside of a floating element and on the top surface of the support wafer to permit backside optical transduction. This design represents a truly flush-mounted, miniature, direct wall shear-stress sensor that possesses immunity from EMI and transverse element movement due to pressure fluctuations and/or vibrations. The optical transduction of the floating element motion is achieved by imaging the Moiré fringe movement via a 16-channel high-temperature, fiber-optic array bundle. This bundle can be several meters long and is attached to a photo-diode array on the non-sensing end. This allows for the electronics to be remotely located away from the high temperatures of the measurement model and facility.

* Information listed above is at the time of submission. *

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