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Innovative tie down

Description:

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Ground/Sea Vehicles, Materials/Processes

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: None

OBJECTIVE: Design and demonstrate an innovative tie-down that enables loading more vehicles on amphibious ships, without modifying the ships or the vehicles.

DESCRIPTION: System that meets heavy weather requirements for securing existing vehicles to existing ship decks while reducing broken stow (target broken stow is 20%). Solution must be a product that is lightweight, easily handled, low maintenance and compatible with a salt-water environment. (Broken stow is the ratio of unusable deck space on (due to cargo tie-down configuration, or etc) to total deck space. Broken stow represents lost opportunity to carry additional vehicles, impacting our warfighters. Broken stow is affected by lashing/tie-down requirements, configuration and lashing material used.)

Tie-down standards (number of tie-down provisions and G-force criteria) for vehicles and equipment are outlined in Military Standard 209K. A tie-down configuration that meets heavy weather requirement results in a broken stow of approximately 70%. 70% broken stow reduces the equipment a MEU can transport too much to be effective.

Instead, a typical current tie-down configuration utilizes 4 tie-downs from vehicle to the deck; each is 2-4 ft long, 90 degrees (from the longitudinal axis) and 30-60 degrees (from the vertical axis). Utilizing this configuration results in a broken stow factor of approximately 35%, but it does not meet heavy weather requirements. Typical lashing material is chains with strength ranging from 15,000 lbs to 70,000 lbs. The chains are heavy (weighing up to 90 lbs each), cumbersome and labor intensive.

One approach would be to develop a restraint that can run from attachment points on the deck under the vehicle to the vehicle attachment points. The challenge with such an approach is to design something that can be employed by a service member in the limited space under a military vehicle.

Proposers cannot modify the ship or vehicle designs. The solution must take into account the size and weight of the equipment being restrained.

PHASE I: Research needs to identify possible technologies for cargo restraints onboard amphibious shipping which can meet the below reference criteria (heavy weather).

PHASE II: Develop and demonstrate a prototype system in a realistic environment. Conduct testing to prove feasibility over extended operating conditions. The Marine Corps will provide vehicle(s) and test resources.

PHASE III: This system could be used in a broad range of military and civilian applications where mobile loads have to be secured for transportation. Examples include rail movement and commercial shipboard movement of wheeled heavy vehicles.

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: This system could be used in a broad range of military and civilian applications where mobile loads have to be secured for transportation. Examples include rail movement and commercial shipboard movement of wheeled heavy vehicles.

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