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NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DEAFNESS AND OTHER COMMUNICATION DISORDERS (NIDCD)

Description:

The NIDCD supports research on the normal mechanisms of, as well as on diseases and disorders of hearing, balance, smell, taste, voice, speech and language. The Institute also supports research related to disease prevention and health promotion. The NIDCD addresses special biomedical and behavioral problems associated with people who have communication impairments or disorders. The NIDCD also supports efforts to create and refine devices, as well as develop cellular-based applications that may replace or substitute for lost and impaired sensory and communication functions. For more specific information about areas of interest to the NIDCD, please visit our home page at http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/. Phase IIB Competing Renewal Awards The NIDCD will accept Phase IIB SBIR/STTR Competing Renewal grant applications to continue the process of developing products that require approval of a Federal regulatory agency (e.g., FDA, FCC). Such products include, but are not limited to: medical implants, drugs, vaccines, and new treatment or diagnostic tools that require FDA approval. The NIDCD will accept applications for up to two (2) years and up to $750,000 per year in total costs. This renewal grant should allow small businesses to get to a stage where interest and investment by third parties is more likely. Please contact your Program Director or Roger Miller, Ph.D., (NIDCD SBIR/STTR coordinator) before beginning the process of putting an application together. Prospective applicants are strongly encouraged to contact NIH staff prior to submission of a Competing Renewal application. Prospective applicants are strongly encouraged to submit to the program contact a letter of intent that includes the following information: • Descriptive title of the proposed research • Name, address, and telephone number of the Principal Investigator • Names of other key personnel • Participating institutions • Funding Opportunity Announcement Number (e.g., PA-10-XXX) Although a letter of intent is not required, is not binding, and does not enter into the review of a subsequent application, the information that it contains allows NIH staff to estimate the potential review workload and plan the review. It is expected that only a portion of NIDCD SBIR/STTR Phase II awards will be eligible for a Phase IIB Competing Renewal award. Hearing and Balance Program Research and development related to lost auditory function. Development of treatment modalities to prevent or lessen the effects of hearing disorders; development of new hearing aids, cochlear implants, and other assistive devices; development of systems designed to increase utilization of computers, telecommunication devices, or alerting systems by individuals with hearing impairments; development of improved screening technologies to assess hearing loss, especially in neonates and infants; development of new or improved batteries for hearing aids and or cochlear implants, including solar rechargeable devices; development of system on a chip technologies (e.g. DSP/VLSI/ASIC) to provide self fitting, self adjusting, or other features that increase performance, accessibility, or affordability of hearing aids; development of better earmolds to address allergy, occlusion effect and/or feedback complaints; development of new outcome measures for assessing the efficacy of treatments for hearing disorders; development of technologies for the study, diagnosis and treatment of tinnitus including development of neural prostheses to treat specific neural deficits; development of technologies for the study, diagnosis and treatment of otitis media including non-invasive diagnostics to identify middle ear pathogens, novel antibacterial strategies, and prophylactic anti-microbial strategies. Research and development related to lost vestibular function. Development of tests and treatments for balance disorders, particularly for the elderly; development of clinical tests, instrumentation and software systems to assess balance/vestibular function, including otolithic functions and eye movements associated with the vestibulo-ocular reflex; development of instruments and tests measuring head stability and vestibular function during natural stimulation of the vestibular system including during locomotion; development of perceptual reporting techniques and psychological indices for the clinical assessment of the balance-disordered patient; development of tests and new outcome measures for assessing the efficacy of physical rehabilitative regimens for balance disorders; and development of assistive devices for balance disorders, including prostheses involving electrical stimulation of the vestibular system. Development of new research tools to aid in the study of the auditory and/or balance systems including neuroimaging techniques (e.g. software tools, neuroanatomic tracer; optical and, multielectrode methods of assessing neural activity; new animal models of impaired function; diagnostic tools for inner ear function, including DNA-based assays and biochemical markers of disease. Development of improved tests and instruments for screening and diagnosis of inner ear function; development of technologies to enable gene transfer to the inner ear, including viral vectors; development of cell type specific markers and probes to examine cell lineage in inner ear regeneration; development of relevant software, including computational modeling tools, databases or websites. Roger L. Miller, Ph.D. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders 301-402-3458, Fax: 301-402-6251 Email: millerr@nidcd.nih.gov Voice, Speech, and Language Programs Research on voice, speech, and language disorders focuses on determining the nature, causes, treatment and prevention of communication disorders such as stuttering, spasmodic dysphonia, dysarthria, and aphasia. Emphasis is on research and development of diagnostic measures and intervention strategies for voice, speech, swallowing, and language disorders; development of communication and other assistive devices for individuals with voice, speech, swallowing, and language disorders; development of speech and language assessments and interventions for nonverbal autistic individuals; development of new systems for visual communication by individuals who are deaf or severely hearing impaired; development of new systems of communication for individuals with motor speech impairment, including a brain computer interface (BCI) communication prosthesis; development of innovative treatment delivery systems or intervention protocols; design and development of diagnostic measures or materials for early identification of voice, speech and language impairment in children; development of assessments and treatments for childhood and adult voice, speech and language impairment in multi-cultural populations; development of assessment measures of sign language abilities; development of improved artificial larynges and tracheoesophageal shunts; development of artificial intelligence computer models that simulate normal and disordered voice, speech and language. Judith A. Cooper, Ph.D. [Language Program] National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders 301-496-5061, Fax: 301-402-6251 Email: cooperj@nidcd.nih.gov Lana Shekim, Ph.D. [Speech & Voice Program] National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders 301-496-5061, Fax: 301-402-6251 Email: shekiml@nidcd.nih.gov Taste and Smell Program Research on the development of easily administered diagnostic tools for testing human chemosensory function in population studies; epidemiological studies of the prevalence of taste and smell disorders; intervention strategies for smell and taste disorders; development of bitter taste-blockers targeted toward pharmaceuticals; the development of artificial sweeteners; influence of taste and smell haplotypes on chemosensory sensitivity; chemosensory stem cell biology; human pheromone detection; retronasal olfaction; high-throughput screening of putative chemosensory ligand-receptor interactions; olfactory biomarkers for neurodegenerative disease; chemosensory risk factors affecting diet and health; biosensors and electronic noses for medical and industrial applications; and the development of an inventory of chemicals at exceptional high purity. Barry J. Davis, Ph.D. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders 301-402-3464, Fax: 301-402-6251 Email: davisb1@nidcd.nih.gov Other Research Topic(s) Within the Mission of the Institute For additional information on research topics, contact: Roger L. Miller, Ph.D. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders 301-402-3458, Fax: 301-402-6251 Email: millerr@nidcd.nih.gov For administrative and business management questions, contact: Mr. Christopher P. Myers Grants Management Officer National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders 301-435-0713, Fax: 301-402-1758 Email: myersc@nidcd.nih.gov
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