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Predictive Missile Sustainment and Reliability Capability

Description:

TECHNOLOGY AREA(S): Materials 

OBJECTIVE: Develop a capability that can collect and fuse maintenance, test, inspection, and engineering data from multiple data streams, formats, and sources for predicting reliability and maintainability issues for a nuclear weapon system that must be viable and credible to the warfighter 40 years past its service life. Provide prognostic capability to identify most urgent sustainment needs. Lifetime-predictive capabilities based on damage accumulation models, physical aging principles, and physics-based understanding. This capability will define the optimal resources on most pressing issues, and reduce costly and unnecessary premature component replacement or maintenance. 

DESCRIPTION: Knowing in advance of entering the wear-out phase for subsystems can provide lead time for planning supply chain upgrades and modifications to the system. This is very important when considering systems that sit in storage for the majority of their lifetimes and are required to operate at high reliabilities upon immediate use. Nuclear weapons may reside in a dormant state for many years within a needed service life of decades (approximately 30-50 years) and then be required to operate with high reliabilities. The typical environment for a nuclear weapon is to be stored in a non-environmentally controlled facility for two years as part of a pylon or launcher package, minimally tested at two years as part of a package, returned to storage for two more years, minimally tested again, returned to storage for two more years, then downloaded for the package and undergo maintenance actions (i.e. Limited Life Component exchange), extensive system level testing, and returned to storage to start the cycle again. 

PHASE I: Identify a feasible cost-effective method for using existing data from multiple data streams, formats, and sources for predicting reliability and maintainability issues. 

PHASE II: Implement cost-effective methodology for predicting how aging of nuclear weapon systems impacts sub-system reliability. Ability to collect and fuse maintenance, test, inspection, and engineering data from multiple data streams, formats, and sources for predicting reliability and maintainability issues. 

PHASE III: Develop a transition strategy for applying Phase II to other military and commercial applications. 

REFERENCES: 

1: NNSA Document R005, "New Material and Stockpile Evaluation Program," Issue B1, Jul 2016.

2:  MIL-HDBK-1798, "Mechanical Equipment and Systems Integrity Program (MECSIP)," 24 Sep 2001

3:  MIL-STD-1530, "DoD Standard Practice, Aircraft Structural Integrity Program (ASIP)," 1 Nov 2005

KEYWORDS: Aging, Surveillance, Reliability, Maintainability, Mechanical And Electrical Property Modeling, Nuclear Weapon Sustainment 

CONTACT(S): 

James Singleton (AFRL/RQRM) 

(661) 275-5907 

james.singleton.7@us.af.mil 

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