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Thermal Characteristics of Ferrite Phase Shifters

Description:

TECHNOLOGY AREA(S): Sensors 

OBJECTIVE: To determine the change in a ferrite phase shifters electrical response as a function of temperature and frequency. Use the information gained from the previous objective to determine the minimum and maximum variance of ferrite phase shifters electrical response. Additionally, to determine if these changes are the result of the material properties, manufacturing process or a combination of the two. 

DESCRIPTION: The current method to characterize ferrite phase shifters used in phased array antennas during the overhaul process at OC-ALC requires a minimum of 16 hours. This characterization has to test each ferrite phase shifter at multiple temperatures and frequencies then match that response to a specific response curve out of several dozen. It is believed that the number of response curves could be reduced to less than one dozen. It is also possible that a ferrite phase shifters response could be predicted based on a single temperature or frequency characterization. 

PHASE I: Information learned from this study could be used to improve the characterization process by reducing test time and/or equipment maintenance costs. The information could also be used to the Governments advantage during new equipment or system acquisition. 

PHASE II: Develop a device or procedure that reduces the 16 hours phase array antenna overhaul. Reducing cost and improving quality of the repair is desired. 

PHASE III: Commercialize the Thermal Characteristics of Ferrite Phase Shifters technologies for use by commercial and/or Government, overhaul entities, and DoD users/depot facilities. 

REFERENCES: 

1: Characteristics of Ferrite Magnets (https://e-magnetsuk.com/ferrite_magnets/characteristics.aspx)

2:  High Power Reciprocal Ferrite Switches Using Latching Faraday Rotators, Charles R. Boyd Jr. Microwave Applications Group. IEEE S-MTT International Microwave Symposium Workshop: Issues in Ferrites and Dielectrics for High Power Applications, Philadelphia

3:  Phased Array Antenna Development, J.Frank, The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, TG-882, March 1967, www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/656888.pdf

KEYWORDS: Ferrite Phase Shifters, Phased Array Antennas 

CONTACT(S): 

Krystyl Wagner 

(405) 736-5261 

krystyl.wagner@us.af.mil 

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