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Noninvasive placement and activation of deep-brain stimulating magnetic particles for reduction of drug-seeking behaviors

Award Information
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services
Branch: National Institutes of Health
Contract: 1R41DA045398-01
Agency Tracking Number: R41DA045398
Amount: $229,701.00
Phase: Phase I
Program: STTR
Solicitation Topic Code: NIDA
Solicitation Number: PA16-303
Timeline
Solicitation Year: 2016
Award Year: 2018
Award Start Date (Proposal Award Date): 2018-03-01
Award End Date (Contract End Date): 2020-02-29
Small Business Information
5611 ROOSEVELT ST
Bethesda, MD 20817-6739
United States
DUNS: 809594661
HUBZone Owned: No
Woman Owned: No
Socially and Economically Disadvantaged: No
Principal Investigator
 FAIR VASSOLER
 (508) 887-4256
 fair.vassoler@tufts.edu
Business Contact
 IRVING WEINBERG
Phone: (301) 346-7944
Email: inweinberg@gmail.com
Research Institution
 TUFTS UNIVERSITY BOSTON
 
136 Harrison Avenue
BOSTON, MA 02111-1901
United States

 Nonprofit college or university
Abstract

Abstract
Deep brain stimulationDBSwith implantable electrodes has been used for reduction of
ethanol abuse and drug seeking behaviors in EuropeThe use of such deep brain
stimulation procedures has been problematic because of concerns about invasiveness of
the procedureApplicant has developed a new noninvasive method of transporting magnetic particles
directly to target sites within the brainWe propose to use this method to place magnetic
particles in brain locations where DBS studies have shown reductions in drug seeking
behaviorOnce placedthe magnetic particles can be activated through external
application of magnetic fields to stimulate neurons mechanicallyWhen translated into
clinical usemagnetic activation could be performed with a wearable deviceas has been
done for other neurological conditionsmigraineepilepsyThe particles are designed to
degrade over a pre selected time intervale gsix monthsIn this proposalwe will demonstrate the short term safety and efficacy of the construct
in an rodent model of opiate relapse after a period of abstinenceEfficacy will be measured
by quantifying reinstatement of drug seeking behaviorThe results of this collaborative
work will lay the foundation for Phase II studieswhich will provide information needed
for human trials Summary
Deep brain stimulation with implantable electrodes has been used for reduction of
ethanol abuse and drug seeking behaviors in EuropeThe use of such deep brain
stimulation procedures has been problematic because of concerns about invasiveness of
the procedureCompany proposes to develop a noninvasive replacement for electrodebased deep brain stimulation

* Information listed above is at the time of submission. *

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