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Universal Navigation Solution Manager

Description:

TECHNOLOGY AREA(S): Sensors 

OBJECTIVE: Develop and demonstrate a universal navigation solution manager that provides the best possible navigation solution without human intervention using conventional and alternative navigation sensors in an environment where some or all of those sensors might be compromised, contested, degraded, or denied. 

DESCRIPTION: Increased dependence on Global Positioning System (GPS) has driven the need for alternative navigation solutions in using these systems for critical operations where precise system performance is desired and GPS might be compromised, contested, degraded, or denied. The navigation accuracy and availability of conventional and alternative navigation solutions provided in such a compromised, contested, degraded, or denied environment have the potential to vary depending on the challenges presented by the environment. In addition to accuracy and availability, one must also consider the integrity of the sensed information such that compromised data and/or data estimates that exceed specified limits are excluded from the final navigation solution [1]. Furthermore, the accuracy, availability, and integrity of conventional and alternative navigation information sources may change during the duration of the mission and may depend on factors such as flight dynamics, mission status, sensor parameters, location, system health, etc. The objective is to develop an innovative solution analogous to that of GPS Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) [2] that is capable of identifying and monitoring the accuracy, availability, and integrity of conventional and alternative navigation sources for the duration of the mission and ingesting them into a navigation solution accordingly to provide the best possible navigation solution without the intervention of a human. In advancing alternative navigation technologies applicable to Precision, Navigation, and Timing (PNT), this effort is a key enabler for precision engagements in compromised, contested, degraded, or denied environments in the Army Modernization Priorities for Long Range Precision Fires. Addressing the technical issue of computing the best navigation solution using conventional and/or alternative methods without human intervention will allow for performance improvements in compromised, contested, degraded, or denied environments. By advancing alternative navigation solutions applicable to Army mission scenarios, this effort is an enabler for extended range for systems in the Army Modernization Priorities for Long Range Precision Fires. 

PHASE I: Develop, test, and validate a universal navigation solution manager that demonstrates the capability to provide the best navigation solution by autonomously adjudicating the accuracy, availability, and integrity of conventional and alternative navigation sensors in compromised, contested, degraded, or denied environments. Further define the complete proof-of-concept universal navigation solution manager that will be developed in Phase II. 

PHASE II: Develop, test, and validate a universal navigation solution manager that demonstrates the capability to provide the best navigation solution by autonomously adjudicating the accuracy, availability, and integrity of conventional and alternative navigation sensors in compromised, contested, degraded, or denied environments. The complete proof-of-concept universal navigation solution manager will be delivered to AMRDEC at the end of Phase II. In the event that DoD Components identify topics that will involve classified work in Phase II, companies invited to submit a proposal must have or be able to obtain the proper facility and personnel clearances in order to perform Phase II work. International Traffic in Army Regulation (ITAR) control may be required. Contract Security Classification Specifications, DD Form 254, may be required. 

PHASE III: Advance the universal solution manager developed in Phase II to a marketable product addressing the size, weight, power, cost, and operational environment of military and commercial systems. Precision operation in contested, degraded, or denied environments is important to many missile applications. The ability to autonomously provide the best possible navigation solution in compromised, contested, degraded, or denied environments would be advantageous to many Army systems including current and future systems within Long Range Precision Fires. This technology has the potential to find uses in both military and commercial applications. Commercial applications could include emergency personnel or civilian operations where precision is required such as in urban canyons, mining and tunneling, and indoor environments where conventional and/or alternative navigation sensors have the potential to be compromised, contested, degraded, or denied. 

REFERENCES: 

1: Federal Radionavigation Plan. Technical Report DOT-VNTSC-RITA-05-12/DoD-4650.5, Springfield, VA: Joint Publication by US Departments of Defense, Homeland Security, and Transportation, December 2005.

2:  R. G. Brown. Receiver autonomous integrity monitoring. Global Positioning System: Theory and Applications, II(143-165), 1993.

3:  M. A. Sturza. Navigation system integrity using redundant measurements. Journal of the Institute of Navigation, 35(4), Winter 1988-1989.

4:  Encyclopedia of Polymer Science and Technology, 3rd edition, Wiley, 2007.

5:  S. Moafipoor. Updating the navigation parameters by direct feedback from the image sensor in a multi-sensor system. In Proceedings of the 19th International Technical Meeting of the Satellite Division of The Institute of Navigation (ION GNSS 2006), 2006.

6:  Y. C. Lee. Navigation system integrity using redundant measurements. In Proceedings of the 17th International Technical Meeting of the Satellite Division of The Institute of Navigation (ION GNSS 2004), 2004.

7:  Craig D. Larson, John Raquet, and Michael J. Veth. Developing a framework for image-based integrity. In Proceedings of ION GNSS 2009, pages 778-789, September 2009.

8:  J. L. Farrell and F. van Grass. Statistical validation for GPS integrity test. Journal of the Institute of Navigation, 39(2), 1992.

9:  Larson, C. An Integrity Framework for Image-Based Navigation Systems. Ph.D. Thesis, Air Force Institute of Technology, Dayton, OH, USA, 2010.

KEYWORDS: Autonomous, Integrity, Accuracy, Availability, GPS Denied, Alternative Navigation, Precision, Environment 

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