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Usage of Critical Materials, Minerals, Isotopes, and other Naturally Occurring Tracers to Characterize Geothermal Reservoirs

Description:

a.      Usage of Critical Materials, Minerals, Isotopes, and other Naturally Occurring Tracers to Characterize Geothermal Reservoirs

In this subtopic, GTO solicits innovative research and development projects to better characterize geothermal reservoirs by utilizing naturally occurring tracers such as critical materials (lithium, cobalt, etc.), minerals, isotopes, or other components of complex geothermal fluids such as silica or salts. 

 

Optimization of heat exchange performance in geothermal reservoirs is critical; fractures are the conduits for heat transfer and therefore the distribution, length, aperture, connectivity, flowing pressure, thermal conductivity of fractures impact fluid residence time, fracture connectivity, and reservoir volume, all of which control the performance and sustainability of a geothermal reservoir.

 

Applications may include, but are not limited to the following:

·         utilizing fluid-rock interactions of naturally occurring tracers to characterize the fundamental characteristics of the geothermal reservoir;

·         chemical and thermodynamic interactions between critical materials/minerals and other components of complex geothermal fluids (e.g. silica, salts, etc.);

·         obtaining an understanding on the specific source of the critical material(s)/isotopes within the geothermal reservoir; and/or

·         chemical effects of geothermal brines reinjected into the reservoir. 

 

Innovation into extraction technologies for critical materials from geothermal brines or other fluids will be deemed non-responsive and not receive external merit review.

 

In Phase I, applicants should focus on proof-of-concept towards a preliminary geologic model with updates on reservoir parameters including findings from the project. In Phase II, applicants should propose technical metrics regarding improvements to understanding of reservoir parameters, plant efficiency, and costs/revenue that can be benchmarked to existing technologies. 

 

Questions – Contact: William Vandermeer, William.Vandermeer@ee.doe.gov

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