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NOVEL MONITORING CONCEPTS IN THE SUBSURFACE

Description:

21. NOVEL MONITORING CONCEPTS IN THE SUBSURFACE

Maximum Phase I Award Amount: $200,000

Maximum Phase II Award Amount: $1,100,000

Accepting SBIR Phase I Applications: YES

Accepting STTR Phase I Applications: NO

 

Current long-term monitoring and maintenance strategies and technologies are available to verify cleanup performance. This Initiative is aimed at developing and deploying more cost effective long-term strategies and technologies to monitor closure sites (including soil, groundwater and surface water) with multiple contaminants (organics, metals and radionuclides) to verify integrated long-term cleanup performance. Long-term monitoring and maintenance will soon become one of the largest projected cost centers in the overall lifecycle of both Environmental Management; moreover, costs associated with the implemented systems will extend into future Legacy Management. Much of the cost is associated with frequent analyses of contaminants in a large number of monitoring wells. Such measurements are often expensive and the resulting datasets are inefficient and inadequate for meeting long term monitoring objectives. The approach to long-term monitoring is a systems based approach which includes 4 broad themes: spatially integrated monitoring tools, onsite and field monitoring tools & sensor, engineered diagnostic components, and integrated risk management & decision support tools.

 

We propose to solicit the best concepts from industry on the following theme:

A. Real-time Sampling & Analysis of Tank Waste with Remote or On-pipe Monitoring

B. Non-Intrusive Mercury Detection and Measurement

C. Other

 

a.      Real-time Sampling & Analysis of Tank Waste with Remote or On-pipe Monitoring

Introduction: The chemical, radiological, and physical properties of nuclear and hazardous chemical tank waste need to be characterized to meet regulatory requirements and to provide information needed to support decisions and actions related to tank corrosion control (safety basis), industrial hygiene (e.g., worker safety/vapors), retrieval planning (technology selection), waste compatibility assessments for feed staging, waste treatment plant waste acceptance, and tank closure.

 

Challenge: The current approach to obtaining chemical, radiological, and physical properties of tank waste includes obtaining physical grab/core samples and having them analyzed by an analytical laboratory. The sampling tool that is selected to obtain physical samples typically includes a collection of available sampler technology that includes finger-trap samplers, clamshell samplers, drag samplers, auger samplers, core samplers, etc.

 

Data quality objectives (DQOs) for regulator-driven tank waste characterization are challenging to meet with physical sampling because:

·         physical samples are often not representative of the tank volume that was sampled;

·         a long backlog in sample collection and laboratory analysis can exist that slows turn-around times; and

·         the cost to open a tank and perform sample collection and transport can be very high.

 

Need: Innovative sample analysis instrumentation is needed that can be deployed in waste tanks or in/on waste transfer slurry lines to perform in-situ/real-time analysis of Hanford waste. For example, instrumentation that can:

·         perform density, viscosity and rheology measurements in pipes;

·         perform particle size and concentration measurements in pipes;

·         detect and quantify interstitial liquid levels in tanks;

·         detect and quantify halides such as fluoride, chloride and iodine in tanks/pipes;

·         detect and quantify total organic carbon in tanks/pipes; and

·         detect and quantify arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, mercury, copper lead, chromium, cyanide, lead, mercury, nickel, selenium, silver, vanadium, zinc and other constituents.

 

Public Benefit: Adding real-time, in-situ sampling and analysis of hazardous waste in tanks and pipes with remote on-pipe or in-tank monitoring instrumentation will decrease worker exposure to tank waste hazards, such as harmful vapors, by decreasing the number of physical samples that must be taken collected from waste tanks/pipes, transported to an analytical laboratory, and handled during sample analysis. Real-time, in-situ sampling and analysis within tank farms is also expected to support more efficient tank farm and waste treatment/processing facility operations by reducing analysis time from weeks/months to seconds/minutes. More efficient operations will lead to closure of the ageing waste tank (and pipe) infrastructure as early as possible, which is in the best interest of the environment’s and public’s health and safety.

 

Questions – Contact: Latrincy Bates, Latrincy.Bates@em.doe.gov or Grover Chamberlain, grover.chamberlain@em.doe.gov

 

b.      Non-Intrusive Mercury Detection and Measurement

Elemental mercury was extensively used at the Y-12 National Security Complex during the Cold War effort. Losses of significant amounts of mercury to building piping, equipment, and actual building structures (walls and floors – steel, concrete, drywall, Transit [asbestos boards and piping], clay tiles, etc.) occurred. Four former-use large industrial production facilities and their ancillary facilities are contaminated or may be contaminated with elemental and other mercury species to differing concentrations. These facilities are up to four floors in height, with footprints of several hundred thousand square feet each, and miles of piping both inside and outside the facilities, some with holdup and/or decaying conditions present.

 

This subtopic is focused on identifying technologies that can be used to non-intrusively detect elemental mercury in building materials, piping, equipment, and waste containers that will facilitate its segregation and removal. The technologies should be capable of detecting mercury in structures, piping, and equipment constructed of various materials/metals of varying thicknesses in the presence of solid residue materials. Detection equipment must be portable and capable of measuring in all orientations. Real-time analysis and display are preferable, with quantification of sufficient accuracy for use in meeting waste acceptance criteria based on meeting land disposal restrictions for mercury. Mapping of results should be addressed as well.

 

Questions – Contact: Latrincy Bates, Latrincy.Bates@em.doe.gov or Grover Chamberlain, grover.chamberlain@em.doe.gov

 

c.       Other

In addition to the specific subtopics listed above, the Department invites grant applications in other areas that fall within the scope of the topic description above.

 

Questions – Contact: Latrincy Bates, Latrincy.Bates@em.doe.gov or Grover Chamberlain, grover.chamberlain@em.doe.gov

 

References: Subtopic a:

1.      Reed S and J James. 2010. Environmental Restoration Overview - Mountain Creek Industrial Center. Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast, Jacksonville, Florida. Accessed March 27, 2012,

https://doi.org/10.1002/2015WR017016

 

References: Subtopic b:

1.      Denslow K.M., T.L. Moran, G.K. Boeringa, S.W. Glass, K.D. Boomer, T.A. Wooley, and J.R. Gunter, et al. 2020. "Progress on Advancing the Robotic Air-slot Volumetric Inspection System (RAVIS) for Hanford Under-tank Inspection." In WM Symposium 2020. PNNL-SA-150753. (A link to an electronic online copy is only available if a user profile is created through the Waste Management Symposium site (https://www.wmsym.org/technical-program/proceedings/). A copy can be provided by a PNNL author or WRPS author upon request.)

 

2.      Wooley, T.A., J. Vitali, J.R. Gunter, K.D. Boomer, K.M. Denslow, and D.M. Stewart. 2020. “Technology Development for Under Tank Inspection of Double-Shell Tanks-20045,” Waste Management Symposia 2020, March 8-12, 2020, Phoenix, Arizona. (A link to an electronic online copy is only available if a user profile is created through the Waste Management Symposium site (https://www.wmsym.org/technical-program/proceedings/). A copy can be provided by a PNNL author or WRPS author upon request.)

 

3.      Denslow K.M., T.L. Moran, M.R. Larche, S.W. Glass, K.D. Boomer, S.E. Kelly, and T.A. Wooley, et al. 2019. "Progress on Advancing Robotic Ultrasonic Volumetric Inspection Technology for Hanford Under-tank Inspection." In WM Symposium 2019. PNNL-SA-140670. (A link to an electronic online copy is only available if a user profile is created through the Waste Management Symposium site (https://www.wmsym.org/technical-program/proceedings/). A copy can be provided by a PNNL author or WRPS author upon request.)

 

4.      Girardot, C.L., J.R. Gunter, N.M. Young, and J.S. Garfield. 2019. Double-Shell Tank Integrity Program Plan, RPP-7574, Rev. 6, Washington River Protection Solutions and AEM Consulting, Richland, Washington. (A link to an electronic online copy of Rev. 6 is not available. A copy may be provided by a WRPS author upon request. The last version that is available online is: Boomer, K.D. 2007. Double-Shell Tank Integrity Program Plan, RPP-7574, Rev. 2, CH2MHILL Hanford Group, Richland, Washington. https://www.emcbc.doe.gov/SEB/TCC/Documents/Document%20Library/011819//Attachment%20L-16%20Documents/27_RPP-7574_R2.pdf)

 

5.      Denslow K.M., T.L. Moran, M.R. Larche, and S.W. Glass. 2018. "Hanford Under-tank Inspection with Ultrasonic Volumetric Non-destructive Examination Technology." In WM Symposia 2018. PNNL-SA-139618. (A link to an electronic online copy is only available if a user profile is created through the Waste Management Symposium site (https://www.wmsym.org/technical-program/proceedings/). A copy can be provided by a PNNL author upon request.)

 

6.      Denslow K.M., T.L. Moran, M.R. Larche, and S.W. Glass. 2018. NDE Technology Development Program for Non-Visual Volumetric Inspection Technology - Phase I Summary Report. PNNL-26924 Rev. 1. Richland, WA: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1479463

 

7.      Denslow K.M., T.L. Moran, M.R. Larche, S.W. Glass III, C.P. Baker and S.A. Bailey. 2018. NDE Technology Development Program for Non-Visual Volumetric Inspection Technology Phase II Technical Requirements for Sensor & Robotic Deployment System Maturation. PNNL-27340 Rev. 0, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington. (This document is considered Limited Distribution but a copy may be made available upon request from WRPS.)

 

8.      Savannah River Remediation LLC. “Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site.” SRR-CWDA-2010-00128, Rev. 0. Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, South Carolina, 2012, https://www.nrc.gov/docs/ML1304/ML13045A499.pdf

 

9.      Bandyopadhyay K., S. Bush, M. Kassir, B. Mather, P. Shewmon, M. Streicher, B. Thompson, Dv Rooyen and J. Weeks. “Guidelines for Development of Structural Integrity Programs for DOE High-Level Waste Storage Tanks.” BNL-52527, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York, 1997, https://www.osti.gov/biblio/676967

 

References: Subtopic c:

1.      Lines A.M., S.A. Bryan, P. Tse, K.M. Denslow, M.S. Fountain, K.D. Boomer, and D.M. Stewart. 2020. "Application of On-Line Monitoring and Real-Time Characterization of Low Level Waste from Hanford Tanks." In WM Symposium 2020. PNNL-SA-148990. (A link to an electronic online copy is only available if a user profile is created through the Waste Management Symposium site (https://www.wmsym.org/technical-program/proceedings/). A copy can be provided by a PNNL author or WRPS author upon request.)

 

2.      Bryan S.A., A.M. Lines, M.J. Minette, K.J. Cantrell, and S.R. Kimmig. “AP-105 Melter Off-gas Condensate and EMF Evaporator Concentrate Raman and LIBS Quantitative Evaluation for the Use of In-Line Monitoring.” PNNL-28546, Rev. 0/ILM-RPT-002, Rev. 0. Richland, WA: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 2019, https://www.pnnl.gov/main/publications/external/technical_reports/PNNL-28546.pdf

 

3.      Bryan S.A., A.M. Lines, P. Tse, H.M. Felmy, and K.M. Denslow. 2019. Demonstration of On-line Monitoring of AP-105 Tank Waste Sample with Raman Spectroscopy. PNNL-28705. Richland, WA: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. (OSTI has not added this report yet; PNNL can provide a copy upon request.)

 

4.      Lines A.M., P. Tse, H.M. Felmy, J.M. Wilson, J.C. Shafer, K.M. Denslow, and A.N. Still, et al. "On-line, real-time analysis of highly complex processing streams: Quantification of analytes in Hanford tank sample." Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research 58, no. 47:21194-21200. PNNL-SA-143209, 2019, https://www.researchgate.net/publication/336301472_On-line_real-time_analysis_of_highly_complex_processing_streams_Quantification_of_analytes_in_Hanford_tank_sample

 

5.      Bryan S.A., A.M. Lines, and K.M. Denslow. 2018. Raman Online Monitoring. PNNL-27637. Richland, WA: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. (OSTI has not added this report yet; PNNL can provide a copy upon request.)

 

6.      Lines A.M., S.A. Bryan, P. Tse, K.M. Denslow, M.S. Fountain, K.D. Boomer, and A.J. Kim, et al. 2018. "On-Line Monitoring and Real-Time Characterization of Low Level Waste and Off-Gas Condensate Samples using Raman Spectroscopy." In WM Symposium 2019. PNNL-SA-139363. (A link to an electronic online copy is only available if a user profile is created through the Waste Management Symposium site (https://www.wmsym.org/technical-program/proceedings/). A copy can be provided by a PNNL author or WRPS author upon request.)

 

7.      Poirier MR, AM Howe, FR Miera, ME Stone, CC DiPrete, and ME Farrar. 2017. WTP Real-Time In-Line Monitoring Program Tasks 4 and 6: Data Quality and Management and Preliminary Analysis Plan. SRNL-RP-2017-00663, Rev. H, Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC. (OSTI has not added this report yet; SRNL may provide a copy upon request.) 

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