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'Novel Shc Blockers as potential Alzheimer's Disease Therapeutics

Award Information
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services
Branch: National Institutes of Health
Contract: 1R41AG076327-01
Agency Tracking Number: R41AG076327
Amount: $634,071.00
Phase: Phase I
Program: STTR
Solicitation Topic Code: NIA
Solicitation Number: PA20-272
Timeline
Solicitation Year: 2020
Award Year: 2021
Award Start Date (Proposal Award Date): 2021-09-30
Award End Date (Contract End Date): 2023-08-31
Small Business Information
28605 COUNTRY ROAD 104
Davis, CA 95616-2027
United States
DUNS: 081321836
HUBZone Owned: No
Woman Owned: No
Socially and Economically Disadvantaged: No
Principal Investigator
 GINO CORTOPASSI
 (530) 754-9665
 gcortopassi@ucdavis.edu
Business Contact
 GINO CORTOPASSI
Phone: (530) 304-6810
Email: gino@butocorp.com
Research Institution
 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT DAVIS
 
OFFICE OF RESEARCH - SPONSORED PROGRAMS 1850 Research Park Drive, Suite 300
DAVIS, CA 95618-6153
United States

 Nonprofit College or University
Abstract

Abstract. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) affects more than 5M Americans today, and is the most common cause of
dementia in adults. While current medications slightly delay symptoms, no medications exist to cure or stop
disease progression. A current focus at NIA is to identify novel drug targets, that address resilience to AD; also,
there is an increasing perspective at NIA that Multi-target therapy may be necessary to overcome AD. We present
the novel drug target Shc, which was recently shown to be a major resilience factor in conversion from human
MCI to AD1, and whose activity rises in AD hippocampus2. Also, PSAPP mice with genetically decreased Shc
protein had increased cognitive function and memory and survival, with the same burden of plaques and tangles--
thus Shc reduction represents a novel target whose reduction enables a neuroprotective andapos;resilienceandapos; mechanism3.
Mice with genetic Shc deficiency are also protected from age related cerebrovascular dysfunction4 ALS5 and MS6,
so reduction of Shc activity increases neuroprotection and resilience in multiple neurodegenerative conditions. To
try to mimic the demonstrated neuroprotective benefit of genetic Shc reduction with a small molecule, we started
with a repurposing approach to isolate 6 chemical scaffolds with Shc blocking activity7. Then a novel 3-
dimensional scaffold search was carried out to identify 400 new molecules on completely novel scaffolds. These
400 have been winnowed down to a flock of 40 molecules through screening paradigms described in the
application and tested them in 20 HTS assays to confer neural cell resistance to amyloid beta and picked the 5
most neuroprotective. PK experiments on the 2 most neuro-protective revealed a better brain penetrance of one
molecule. Thus Butoandapos;s Aims are (1) to identify the Maximum Tolerated Dose (MTD) of this molecule, 2) to
determine Brain and Blood PBMC target engagement in a mouse model of oxidative stress, and 3) to determine
efficacy in the 5XFAD and ApoE4 mouse model. These Aims, once achieved, will determine the extent to which
molecules that hit a completely novel and never-drugged AD target Shc, are acceptable pre-clinical
pharmacological candidates, and set the stage for further partnering of Shc inhibitors in this indication.Narrative. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) causes dementia in andgt;5M Americans. A current focus at NIA is to identify
novel drug targets, that address resilience to AD; also, there is an increasing perspective at NIA that Multi-target
therapy may be necessary to overcome AD. We focus on small-molecule Shc blockers that increase resilience to
A-beta and other insults. We propose in vivo MTD and efficacy studies in the 5XFAD and ApoE4 mouse model of
our lead compound.

* Information listed above is at the time of submission. *

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