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Imaging Spectropyrometer for Industrial Process and Hypersonic Thermal Protection System Characterization

Description:

OUSD (R&E) CRITICAL TECHNOLOGY AREA(S): Hypersonics The technology within this topic is restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulation (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120-130, which controls the export and import of defense-related material and services, including export of sensitive technical data, or the Export Administration Regulation (EAR), 15 CFR Parts 730-774, which controls dual use items. Offerors must disclose any proposed use of foreign nationals (FNs), their country(ies) of origin, the type of visa or work permit possessed, and the statement of work (SOW) tasks intended for accomplishment by the FN(s) in accordance with the Announcement. Offerors are advised foreign nationals proposed to perform on this topic may be restricted due to the technical data under US Export Control Laws. OBJECTIVE: Produce an imaging spectropyrometer to yield high spatial resolution, highly accurate measurements of surface temperature of non-gray surfaces and accurate estimation of spectral emissivity during materials characterization testing in high-temperature laboratory facilities and high-enthalpy flow facilities such as arc-heated and inductively-coupled plasma wind tunnels. DESCRIPTION: Development and optimization of thermal protection systems (TPS) for hypersonic vehicles rely on accurate knowledge of TPS temperature and emissivity. The requirements are driven by the Test Resource Management Center (TRMC) Hypersonic Test Requirements Roadmap and coordination with the TRMC Hypersonic Roadmap activity is encouraged to ensure the proposed approaches meet the performance and TRL level required to address the needs of the DoD hypersonic community. Current COTS instrumentation provides point measurements, but spatially resolved temperature and emissivity measurements are required to properly account for surface gradients. An imaging spectropyrometer measurement system is needed to yield high spatial resolution, highly accurate measurements of surface temperature of non-gray surfaces and accurate estimation of spectral emissivity during materials characterization testing in high-temperature laboratory facilities and high-enthalpy flow facilities such as arc-heated and inductively-coupled plasma wind tunnels. Performance characteristics needed are: temperature measurement range of 575-4250 K (threshold) and 300-6000 K (objective), temperature measurement resolution 0.1 K threshold and 0.05 K objective, temperature measurement accuracy of 0.5 threshold and 0.1 threshold (in percent of reading for non-gray targets), wavelength range of 0.5-2.0 micrometers threshold and 0.4-5.0 micrometers objective, spectral resolution 0.05 micrometers threshold and 0.01 micrometers objective, temporal resolution 0.1 sec threshold and 0.01 sec objective, and spatial resolution of 2 mm threshold and 0.5 mm objective (128x128 pixels threshold and 1024x1024 objective). Special attention should be paid to compensating the measurements for the impact of stray radiation or reflections from other sources. Additionally, the analysis technique should compensate for potential gaseous and particulate emission/absorption from the medium surrounding the test article. Because of the temporally-varying nature of the USAF application, a snap-shot data acquisition method is preferred (i.e., all spectral/spatial information is acquired in one integration time. Consideration will be given to the best balance of these performance parameters along with the analysis method. PHASE I: The Phase I effort should perform a detailed analysis of alternatives considering different instrumental (e.g. 2-D imaging spectrometer vs push broom imaging spectrometer) and analytical approaches. This effort should culminate in a conceptual design that best satisfies the Threshold/Objective requirements with consideration given to accommodating interference from stray radiation and emission from gaseous/particulate species surrounding the test article. The Phase I design should focus on application in arc-heated facilities, but take into consideration high enthalpy facilities of other technologies. PHASE II: The Phase II effort should produce a prototype imaging spectropyrometer system capable of meeting the Threshold/Objective requirements and be demonstrated in a USAF arc facility for comparison to non-imaging techniques currently in use. PHASE III DUAL USE APPLICATIONS: Phase III efforts would include close coordination with the TRMC Hypersonic Roadmap activity to ensure the capabilities produced meet the performance and TRL level required to address the needs of the DoD hypersonic community. Installation in multiple facilities with varying integration requirements will require production of multiple units. Phase III efforts therefore will require both further R&D and the production of multiple units tailored for various facilities and applications. Pyrometers are widely used in industrial process such as chemical vapor deposition, investment casting, powder metallurgy, and semiconductor production. The additional spatial coverage envisioned by the proposed SBIR product would find wide application in these areas. REFERENCES: 1. Felice, R. A., “The Spectropyrometer – a Practical Multi-wavelength Pyrometer,” Temperature: Its Measurement and Control in Science and Industry; Volume Seven, Eighth International Temperature Symposium held 21-24 October 2002 in Chicago, Illinois. Edited by Dean C. Ripple. AIP Conference Proceedings, Vol. 684. New York: American Institute of Physics, 2003., p.711-716. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.1627211; 2. Taunay PCR, Choueiri EY. Multi-wavelength pyrometry based on robust statistics and cross-validation of emissivity model. Rev Sci Instrum. 2020 Nov 1;91(11):11490; 2. https://doi.org/10.1063/5.0019847; 3. H. Madura, H., Kastek, M., Sosnowski, T., and Orżanowski, T., “Pyrometric Method of Temperature Measurement with Compensation for Solar Radiation,” Metrology and Measurement Systems, Volume 17, page 77-86, 2010. Index 330930, ISSN 0860-8229, http://journals.pan.pl/dlibra/publication/122789/edition/107041/content; 4. Madura, H., Kastek, M., and Pia̧tkowski, T., “Automatic compensation of emissivity in three-wavelength pyrometers,” Volume 51, Issue 1, July 2007, Pages 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.infrared.2006.11.001; 5. Nian, W., Shen, H., Zhu, R., “ Constraint optimization algorithm for spectral emissivity calculation in multispectral thermometry,” Measurement, Volume 170, January 2021, 108725, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.measurement.2020.108725 KEYWORDS: Pyrometry; multi-spectral; hyperspectral; thermal protection systems; hypersonics
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