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5G Test Environment (5GTE)

Description:

OUSD (R&E) CRITICAL TECHNOLOGY AREA(S): Integrated Sensing and Cyber, Advanced computing and Software OBJECTIVE: The objective of the 5GTE Direct to Phase 2 (DP2) SBIR topic is to develop a scalable, open-source Internet of Things (IoT) fifth generation (5G) test environment capability to support research and development of nascent 5G technologies. DESCRIPTION: 5GTE seeks to develop a 5G test environment for IoT devices to enable research, development, and experimentation with a broad range of 5G-capable devices, both static and mobile. The focus of 5GTE is to provide an open-source, realistic 5G radio access network to enable rapid prototyping of wireless protocols and applications including, but not limited to: cyber security, artificial intelligence, and edge-computing. A key requirement of 5GTE is the ability to rapidly and accurately scale as new technologies and devices are introduced/become available. 5GTE must also provide remote access and device update capabilities. To broaden the range of supported devices and to facilitate development, 5GTE should have the ability to support different wireless communication technologies (e.g., fourth generation, wireless fidelity). 5GTE’s network access should support high-fidelity quality of service for experimentation with different 3rd Generation Partnership (3GPP) [1] Project Release 17 [2] use cases. While open-source 5G testbed architectures do exist [3], they do not fully support remote accessibility and management to allow for multiple experiments and tests to co-exist simultaneously. PHASE I: The 5GTE SBIR topic is soliciting DP2 proposals only, which must include supporting documentation of Phase I feasibility. Phase I feasibility must be demonstrated through evidence of: a completed proof of concept/principal or basic prototype system; definition and characterization of system properties/technology capabilities desirable for DoD/IC/government and civilian/commercial use; and capability/performance comparisons with existing state-of-the-art technologies/methodologies (competing approaches). Entities interested in submitting a DP2 proposal must provide documentation to substantiate that the scientific/technical merit and feasibility described above has been achieved and also describe the potential commercial applications. DP2 Phase I feasibility documentation should include, at a minimum: • technical reports describing results and conclusions of existing work, particularly regarding the commercial opportunity or DoD/IC insertion opportunity, risks/mitigations, and technology assessments; • presentation materials and/or white papers; • technical papers; • test and measurement data; • prototype designs/models; • performance projections, goals, or results in different use cases; and, • documentation of related topics such as how the proposed 5GTE solution can enable research and development of nascent 5G technologies. The collection of Phase I feasibility material will verify mastery of the required content for DP2 consideration. DP2 proposers must also demonstrate knowledge, skills, and abilities in the technical areas of: mobile communications, software engineering, network security, cyber security, programmable networking, and artificial intelligence. For detailed information on DP2 requirements and eligibility, please refer to the DoD Broad Agency Announcement and the DARPA Instructions for this topic. PHASE II: The objective of the 5GTE DP2 SBIR topic is to develop a scalable, open-source IoT 5G test environment capability to support research and development of nascent 5G technologies. 5GTE DP2 proposals should: 1. describe a proposed design/architecture to achieve the 5GTE goals, along with application programming interfaces that allow for an open IoT testbed infrastructure; 2. present a plan for maturation of the architecture to a prototype testbed to demonstrate accurate and scalable experimentation capabilities; and, 3. detail a test plan, complete with proposed metrics and scope (e.g., testbed structure, types/numbers of devices, etc.) for verification and validation of the testbed capabilities. 5GTE should have the ability to support multiple isolated environments to enable testing in parallel with security guarantees. Each isolated environment would support full standards compliant user authentication on the 5G core side, where the end devices can use programmable subscriber identity module cards; and the core would support network slicing capabilities. Strong 5GTE proposals would include: • additional scaling capabilities enabled via emulation of various end devices; • solutions based on components with strong open-source development and community support, such as the technology projects that reside within the Linux Foundation [5]; and, • a commercialization plan for the proposed 5GTE which articulates a clear vision for the potential business opportunities as 5G capabilities and standards evolve. Phase II will culminate in a testbed demonstration using one or more compelling IoT use cases consistent with commercial opportunities and/or insertion into the DARPA/I2O Open, Programmable, Secure 5G (OPS-5G) program [4]. The below schedule of milestones and deliverables is provided to establish expectations and desired results/end product for the DP2 effort. Schedule/Milestones/Deliverables: Proposers will execute the research and development (R&D) plan as described in the proposal, including the below: • Month 1: Phase I Kickoff briefing (with annotated slides) to the DARPA Program Manager (PM) including: any updates to the proposed plan and technical approach, risks/mitigations, schedule (inclusive of dependencies) with planned capability milestones and deliverables, proposed metrics, and plan for prototype demonstration/validation. • Months 4, 7, 10: Quarterly technical progress reports detailing technical progress to date, tasks accomplished, risks/mitigations, a technical plan for the remainder of Phase II (while this would normally report progress against the plan detailed in the proposal or presented at the Kickoff briefing, it is understood that scientific discoveries, competition, and regulatory changes may all have impacts on the planned work and DARPA must be made aware of any revisions that result), planned activities, trip summaries, and any potential issues or problem areas that require the attention of the DARPA PM. • Month 12: Interim technical progress briefing (with annotated slides) to the DARPA PM detailing progress made (including quantitative assessment of capabilities developed to date), tasks accomplished, risks/mitigations, planned activities, technical plan for the second half of Phase II, the demonstration/verification plan for the end of Phase II, trip summaries, and any potential issues or problem areas that require the attention of the DARPA PM. • Month 15, 18, 21: Quarterly technical progress reports detailing technical progress made, tasks accomplished, risks/mitigations, a technical plan for the remainder of Phase II (with necessary updates as in the parenthetical remark for Months 4, 7, and 10), planned activities, trip summaries, and any potential issues or problem areas that require the attention of the DARPA PM. • Month 24: Final technical progress briefing (with annotated slides) to the DARPA PM. Final architecture with documented details; a demonstration of the ability to authenticate, monitor, and detect malicious activities in ECUs; documented application programming interfaces; and any other necessary documentation (including, at a minimum, user manuals and a detailed system design document; and the commercialization plan). • Month 30 (Phase II Option period): Interim report of matured prototype performance against existing state-of-the-art technologies, documenting key technical gaps towards productization. • Month 36 (Phase II Option period): Final Phase II Option period technical progress briefing (with annotated slides) to the DARPA PM including prototype performance against existing state-of-the-art technologies, including quantitative metrics for assessment of test environment features/capabilities. PHASE III DUAL USE APPLICATIONS: 5GTE has potential applicability across DoD/IC/government and commercial entities. For DoD/IC/government, 5GTE is extremely well-suited for supporting research to investigate 5G capability enhancements and cyber risks. 5GTE has the same applicability for the commercial sector. Phase III refers to work that derives from, extends, or completes an effort made under prior SBIR funding agreements, but is funded by sources other than the SBIR Program. The Phase III work will be oriented towards transition and commercialization of the developed 5GTE technologies. For Phase III, the proposer is required to obtain funding from either the private sector, a non-SBIR Government source, or both, to develop the prototype into a viable product or non-R&D service for sale in government or private sector markets. Primary 5GTE support will be to national efforts to advance US 5G capabilities and to promote awareness of 5G risks to national security. Results of 5GTE are intended to enable accurate test and evaluation of nascent 5G technologies at scale, across government and industry. REFERENCES: 1. 3GPP. 3GPP - A Global Initiative. https://www.3gpp.org/ 2. 3GPP. 3GPP – The 5G Standard. https://www.3gpp.org/specifications-technologies/releases/release-17 3. Institute for the Wireless Internet of Things at Northeastern University. Testbeds to develop and experiment with open, programmable, 5G networks. https://open5g.info/testbeds/ 4. DARPA Broad Agency Announcement: Open Programmable Secure 5G (OPS-5G), HR001120S0026, January 30, 2020. Available at https://beta.sam.gov/opp/6ee795ad86a044d1a64f441ef713a476/view 5. The Linux Foundation. The Linux Foundation. https://www.linuxfoundation.org/ KEYWORDS: Fifth Generation (5G), Internet of Things (IoT), Test Environment, Scalability, Open-source, Security, Cyber Security, Artificial Intelligence, and Edge-computing
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