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Development of Simulations to Detect Impaired Drivers

Award Information
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services
Branch: National Institutes of Health
Contract: PHS2001-2
Agency Tracking Number: 2R42MH057593-02
Amount: $0.00
Phase: Phase I
Program: STTR
Solicitation Topic Code: N/A
Solicitation Number: N/A
Timeline
Solicitation Year: N/A
Award Year: 2001
Award Start Date (Proposal Award Date): N/A
Award End Date (Contract End Date): N/A
Small Business Information
13766 S HAWTHORNE BLVD HAWTHORNE, CA 90250-7083
HAWTHORNE, CA 90250
United States
DUNS: N/A
HUBZone Owned: No
Woman Owned: No
Socially and Economically Disadvantaged: No
Principal Investigator
 THOMAS MARCOTTE
 (619) 543-5044
 TMARCOTTE@UCSD.EDU
Business Contact
 ALLEN, WADE R
Phone: (310) 679-2281
Email: RWALLEN@SYSTEMSTECH.COM
Research Institution
N/A
Abstract

DESCRIPTION: Millions of individuals in the U.S. are affected by dementing
disorders. Detecting driving impairments in these individuals in a safe,
reliable and cost-efficient manner remains a formidable challenge. The
overarching goal of Phase II is to complete development of novel, low-cost
PC-based computer driving simulations that are valid for the assessment of
driving abilities in varied patient groups over multiple assessments. By
completing final development of technologically advanced, psychometrically
sound driving simulations we hope to further the scientific study of "real
life" outcomes, and make these novel tools available to the research and
clinical community. The specific aims of this project are (1) to enhance the
technological capabilities of software, (2) to improve the sensitivity and
reliability of the test scenarios developed in Phase I, (3) to establish
simulator validity using on-road evaluations in patients with varied
neurocognitive profiles, and (4) to establish the validity of the simulations
for longitudinal assessments by examining patients who are likely change over a
6 month follow-up. Since driving skills may be affected by dementing disorders,
as well as medications, it is anticipated that this technology will have
excellent commercial viability and broad applicability for neurobehavioral
research, treatment trials, and clinical assessments.

PROPOSED COMMERCIAL APPLICATION:
Development of a high fidelity, low cost driving simulator that is well-validated across multiple patient groups longitudinally will provide a significant tool for the assessment of "real life" functioning as it relates to driving. Potential markets include assessment of impaired drivers, monitoring of medication side effects, driver training and rehabilitation (alcohol, drugs, head injuries, disabilities, strokes, etc.), and driver education.

* Information listed above is at the time of submission. *

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