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Hands Free Automatic Coupling Restraint System

Description:

OBJECTIVE: Develop and demonstrate a restraint system that automatically couples the Soldier to the ground vehicle seating system, thus eliminating the need for the Soldier to manually connect (to), activate, disconnect (from) and de-activate the restraint system. DESCRIPTION: The current Army fleet of vehicles contains restraint systems that require the Soldier to manually put them on. If a Soldier decides not to wear his or her restraint, the consequences can result in injury or death. The proposed Hands Free Automatic Coupling Restraint System would provide Soldiers a novel restraint system that does not require them to latch or unlatch the restraint. The system would function such that when the Soldier sits in a seat he/she is automatically connected to the seat with no further input required from the Soldier. The Soldier would stay 100% connected to the seat until dismount or during an emergency evacuation, at which time the system would automatically disconnect. The challenge of this technology objective is to safeguard occupants ranging from a 5th percentile female with and without personal protective equipment to a 95th percentile male with and without personal protective equipment, while mitigating the energy generated by underbody mine blasts, Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs), vehicle collisions (frontal, side, rear and rollover), and severe driving conditions (evasive driving and high-speed off-road driving) that is transferred to the Soldier by coupling them to the seats and allowing the seating system to absorb the energy. The restraint system combined with the seat system technology will improve occupant comfort and cross functionality of both the restraint and seating system application and utility for combat and non-combat vehicles. PHASE I: Design a hands free automatic coupling restraint system and perform modeling and simulation of the restraint system that automatically couples and decouples a Soldier population ranging from a 5th percentile female with and without personal protective equipment to a 95th percentile male with and without personal protective equipment to the ground vehicle seating system. The modeling and simulation would include the Soldier being coupled and restrained to the seat system, demonstrate the restraint performance during underbody blast and IEDs, vehicle collisions (frontal, side, rear and rollover)and compliance to FMVSS 207,208,209,210. A simulation of a Soldier shall demonstrate a typical dismount and an emergency evacuation dismount(safety override feature) PHASE II: Manufacture and validate prototypes based on Phase I work that demonstrates and validates the auto coupling Soldier restraint system described in the objective. Vehicle level demonstration is shown to represent an actual coupling and decoupling event. The system shall be validated against FMVSS standards (207,208,209,210) before a blast or crash event is conducted. After successful component level testing a drop tower test is conducted utilizing anthropomorphic test devices that include the 5th percentile female with and without personal protective equipment and a 95th percentile male with and without personal protective equipment to validate the prototype. Finally a sled testing series (frontal, side, rear and roll over) is conducted with military vehicle crash test parameters (Accelerations, Displacements and Velocities)utilizing anthropomorphic test devices that include the 5th percentile female with and without personal protective equipment and a 95th percentile male with and without personal protective equipment. Any required changes and retests shall be conducted at this time PHASE III: This system has the potential to be utilized in both Military and Civilian truck and automotive applications. This system can replace existing safety technologies with one that is more cost effective and provides better protection to the Soldiers and Civilian REFERENCES: http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a175820.pdf http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a546849.pdf http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a029375.pdf
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