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Compact Air-cooled Laser Modulate-able Source (CALMS)

Description:

Today, flexible compact laser sources in the UVA (315 nm - 400 nm) are not available for lab/field testing or other military applications. Technology solutions to this problem are needed in several key areas: 1) increasing the output power of individual laser modules operating in the UVA spectrum, 2) developing the capability to efficiently combine the outputs of multiple laser modules into a single optical fiber for delivery to an optical pointer, and 3) combining these technologies into a compact system package that is suitable for applications with severe size and weight constraints. State of the art off the shelf diode lasers in this band are 250 mW or less. The ideal system design would be able to accommodate 3 or more lines anywhere within the UVA band, provide greater than 3W power output, be electronically driven from an external pulse source (1-100% duty cycle pulses), permit 2 to 3 orders of magnitude amplitude control, quickly switch between waveforms (DC thru 10kHz), and couple to a 100 micron core fiber output. PHASE I: Formulate and develop a UVA laser system concept that can accommodate three or more lines anywhere within the UVA band, provide greater than 3W power output, be electronically driven from an external pulse source (1-100% duty cycle pulses), permit 2 to 3 orders of magnitude amplitude control, quickly switch between waveforms (DC thru 10kHz), and couple to a 100 micron core fiber output. If the laser is not truly continuous wave, then pulse repetition frequencies of greater than 100 kHz and pulse widths greater than 10ns are required. The volume of the full system shall not exceed 75 cubic inches. The system concept needs to specify all pertinent design details and explain why all materials chosen are believed to be suitable and capable of meeting the desired specifications. A detailed test plan must be developed explaining how a prototype would be validated during Phase II. The Phase I effort will not require access to classified information. If need be, data of the same level of complexity as secured data will be provided to support Phase I work. PHASE II: Upon successful completion of Phase I, the Phase I design will be built and validated using the test plan developed in Phase I. The Phase II effort may require access to classified information. If as a result of the firm's proposed effort access to classified data is required during Phase II, the small business will need to be prepared to obtain appropriate personnel and facility certification for secure data access. PHASE III: The product is expected to transition into military systems. The system could be integrated into existing systems or future developmental programs.
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