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SBIR Tech Transfer (SBIR-TT)

Description:

Topic 8.5 SBIR Tech Transfer (SBIR-TT)

Subtopic 8.5.1TT NOy Cavity Right-Down Instrument

Summary: The Patent Pending NOAA NOy-Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer is a sensitive, compact detector that measures total reactive nitrogen (NOy), as well as NO2, NO and O3 using cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). This product is unique in that the optical cage system holds four optical cavities (with associated sample cells) and a laser together, allowing a measurement of all four trace gases simultaneously and with a robust calibration in a small package. The NOAA CRDS is compact and has lower power, size, weight, and vacuum requirements than chemiluminescence-based instruments while approaching equivalent sensitivity, precision and time response. Climate science and air quality monitoring provide ongoing applications for instrumentation to accurately measure atmospheric trace gases. The precision and accuracy of this instrument make it a versatile alternative to standard chemiluminescence-based NOy instruments currently on the market. The markets for scientific instruments in the U.S. and abroad are well-established and supported by a number of known scientific instrument manufacturers, including at least three domestic and three international commercial manufacturers of a cavity ring down NO2 instruments. Given the compact and efficient performance and other unique features of this instrument for measuring ambient air across a range of environments and measurement platforms, it is an excellent licensing opportunity for the scientific instrument manufacturing sector.

Project Goals: The NOAA NOy CRDS was developed for the Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder, CO, in order to support the lab’s research activities. There is one prototype in existence, which is in regular use by the lab. The goal of NOAA’s Technology Transfer program is to encourage the broader use of NOAA’s patented or patent-pending technologies in commercial markets and/or to encourage the development of new uses for our technologies. The project goal, therefore, for this SBIR Technology Transfer solicitation is to receive proposals from companies that are interested and able to develop a more compact and commercially viable version of the NOAA NOy for sale. In order to accomplish this goal, companies sending proposals against this SBIR Technology Transfer topic would be required to sign a one-year, no-cost research and technology license (see Reference below) which may be renewed under Phase II, should the Phase I activities be deemed successful.

Phase I Activities and Expected Deliverables:

Activities include

  • Define baseline requirements including operation/install requirements on targeted platforms
  • Refine system concept and specifications for intended use, if necessary
  • Define commercial design concept to meet intended requirements and specifications
  • Determine feasibility and cost to build prototype and estimate operational costs for a Phase III system
  • Perform commercial application study identifying market space and potential revenue from the product

Deliverables include

  • Commercial Product Design and Feasibility: 1) Product/application design and description, 2) Need - what problem is this application solving?, 3) Target industry sector(s) for the product/application, 4) Additional Research and Development needs, 5) Anticipated costs to bring product to market
  • Marketing study: 1) Size of the industry, 2) Room for growth, 3) Competitive landscape, 4) Prospective markets
  • Sales and Marketing Plan: 1) Target markets for years 1, 5, and beyond, 2) Anticipated sales for years 1, 5, and beyond, 3) Anticipated selling price and per unit profit margins, 4) Anticipated time to turn a profit
  • Phase II Prototype Design and Build Plan

Phase II Activities and Expected Deliverables:

Activities include

  • Develop detailed system design for Phase II prototype system.
  • Perform full system performance analysis and determined compliance with requirements and specifications from Phase I.
  • Develop test / verification plan for evaluating Phase II prototype performance.
  • Fabricate Phase II prototype system.
  • Execute performance / verification testing.
  • Identify commercial products and market space being addressed by the technology developed through this effort.

Deliverables include

  • Performance Analysis Report.
  • Test/Verification Plan
  • Performance Testing Report
  • Phase II Prototype System

References:

  • For more information on NOAA NOy Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer: http://techpartnerships.noaa.gov/WorkingwithNOAA/OpenOpportunities/TabId/299/ArtMID/1381/ArticleID/10778/LICENSING-OPPORTUNITY-NOy-Cavity-Ring-Down-Spectrometer.aspx
  • One-year, no-cost research and technology license information: http://techpartnerships.noaa.gov/sites/orta/Documents/RESEARCH%20LICENSE%2011-6-12.pdf

 

Subtopic 8.5.2TT Smart Module for Communications Processing and Interface

Summary: Engineers at NOAA’s National Data Buoy Center have developed a patent-pending data collection and reporting system, the Smart Module for Communications Processing and Interface, for use on data buoys or similar ocean- or land-based platforms where environmental data are being collected. The benefit of the Smart Module design is that it may be readily retrofitted to a data buoy, weather station, or other similar applications, in order to add additional data acquisition capabilities or features, without disturbing existing communications and data logging equipment at the location. This saves both time and money for testing and certifying new equipment at existing data gathering sites, some of which may be quite remote and difficult to access. By eliminating the risk of compromising an entire system by adding new components, the Smart Module makes adding new capabilities to existing platforms relatively simple and extremely cost effective.

Project Goals: The Smart Module was developed for the National Buoy Data Center (NDBC) in Stennis, MS, in order to support NOAA’s operational buoy systems around the world. The NDBC manufactures a small number of these modules in house for its own use. The goal of NOAA’s Technology Transfer program is to encourage the broader use of NOAA’s patented or patent-pending technologies in commercial markets and/or to encourage the development of new uses for our technologies. The project goal, therefore, for this SBIR Technology Transfer solicitation is to receive proposals from companies that are interested and able to develop one or more commercially viable applications for the patent-pending Smart Module technology. In order to accomplish this goal, companies sending proposals against this SBIR Technology Transfer topic would be required to sign a one-year, no-cost research and technology license (see Reference below) which may be renewed under Phase II, should the Phase I activities be deemed successful.

Phase I Activities and Expected Deliverables:

Activities include

  • Define baseline requirements including operation/install requirements on targeted platforms
  • Refine system concept and specifications for intended use, if necessary
  • Define commercial design concept to meet intended requirements and specifications
  • Determine feasibility and cost to build prototype and estimate operational costs for a Phase III system • Perform commercial application study identifying market space and potential revenue from the product

Deliverables include

  • Commercial Product Design and Feasibility: 1) Product/application design and description, 2) Need - what problem is this application solving?, 3) Target industry sector(s) for the product/application, 4) Additional Research and Development needs, 5) Anticipated costs to bring product to market
  • Marketing study: 1) Size of the industry, 2) Room for growth, 3) Competitive landscape, 4) Prospective markets
  • Sales and Marketing Plan: 1) Target markets for years 1, 5, and beyond, 2) Anticipated sales for years 1, 5, and beyond, 3) Anticipated selling price and per unit profit margins, 4) Anticipated time to turn a profit
  • Phase II Prototype Design and Build Plan

Phase II Activities and Expected Deliverables:

Activities include

  • Develop detailed system design for Phase II prototype system.
  • Perform full system performance analysis and determined compliance with requirements and specifications from Phase I.
  • Develop test / verification plan for evaluating Phase II prototype performance.
  • Fabricate Phase II prototype system.
  • Execute performance / verification testing.
  • Identify commercial products and market space being addressed by the technology developed through this effort

Deliverables include

  • Performance Analysis Report.
  • Test/Verification Plan
  • Performance Testing Report
  • Phase II Prototype System

References:

  • For more information on Smart Module: http://techpartnerships.noaa.gov/WorkingwithNOAA/OpenOpportunities/TabId/299/ArtMID/1381/ArticleID/11371/Smart-Module-for-Communications-Processing-and-Interface-Patent-Pending.aspx
  • One-year, no-cost research and technology license information: http://techpartnerships.noaa.gov/sites/orta/Documents/RESEARCH%20LICENSE%2011-6-12.pdf

 

Subtopic 8.5.3TT System for Monitoring, Determining, and Reporting Directional Spectra of Ocean Surface Waves in Near Realtime from a Moored Buoy

Summary: NOAA and a number of other scientific and academic institutions have built and maintained an extensive national network of buoys with the purpose of providing more accurate weather and water forecasts to the public. As a part of this network, NOAA engineers have developed a System for Monitoring, Determining and Reporting Directional Spectra of Ocean Surface Waves from a Moored Buoy, which was awarded a US patent in 2009. While many existing weather data buoys adequately measure wave height, oftentimes other useful wave data, such as direction, are not captured. This could be important, for example, if wave direction is opposite tidal direction, causing conditions near shore where wave heights may increase. In addition, wave direction may differ from wind direction, and thus a report of wind direction may not always be indicative of wave direction. Wave direction in particular is useful for mariners (both commercial and recreational) when plotting a course to avoid broaching waves. Similarly, scientists, decision makers, and the general public find wave direction data useful in studying shore erosion, environmental impacts of waves, and for calculating ideal surf times and locations. Furthermore, other wave data (e.g. - slope) may be useful to oceanographers and engineers, as well as mariners. While NOAA has integrated this technology into its buoy network, there is still great potential for a commercial venture to use the technology to new networks and applications using this technology to serve highly personalized data to specific regions or industries (e.g., energy, tourism, etc.).

Project Goals: The technology was developed for the National Buoy Data Center (NDBC) in Stennis, MS, in order to support NOAA’s operational buoy systems around the world. The goal of NOAA’s Technology Transfer program is to encourage the broader use of NOAA’s patented or patent-pending technologies in commercial markets and/or to encourage the development of new uses for our technologies. The project goal, therefore, for this SBIR Technology Transfer solicitation is to receive proposals from companies that are interested and able to develop one or more commercially viable applications for the patent-pending wave direction technology. In order to accomplish this goal, companies sending proposals against this SBIR Technology Transfer topic would be required to sign a one-year, no-cost research and technology license (see Reference below) which may be renewed under Phase II, should the Phase I activities be deemed successful.

Phase I Activities and Expected Deliverables:

Activities include

  • Define baseline requirements including operation/install requirements on targeted platforms
  • Refine system concept and specifications for intended use, if necessary
  • Define commercial design concept to meet intended requirements and specifications
  • Determine feasibility and cost to build prototype and estimate operational costs for a Phase III system
  • Perform commercial application study identifying market space and potential revenue from the product

Deliverables include

  • Commercial Product Design and Feasibility: 1) Product/application design and description, 2) Need - what problem is this application solving?, 3) Target industry sector(s) for the product/application, 4) Additional Research and Development needs, 5) Anticipated costs to bring product to market
  • Marketing study: 1) Size of the industry, 2) Room for growth, 3) Competitive landscape, 4) Prospective markets
  • Sales and Marketing Plan: 1) Target markets for years 1, 5, and beyond, 2) Anticipated sales for years 1, 5, and beyond, 3) Anticipated selling price and per unit profit margins, 4) Anticipated time to turn a profit
  • Phase II Prototype Design and Build Plan

Activities include

  • Develop detailed system design for Phase II prototype system.
  • Perform full system performance analysis and determined compliance with requirements and specifications from Phase I.
  • Develop test / verification plan for evaluating Phase II prototype performance.
  • Fabricate Phase II prototype system.
  • Execute performance / verification testing.
  • Identify commercial products and market space being addressed by the technology developed through this effort

Deliverables include

  • Performance Analysis Report.
  • Test/Verification Plan
  • Performance Testing Report
  • Phase II Prototype System

References:

  • For more information on US Patent 819,5395: http://www.google.com/patents/US8195395
  • One-year, no-cost research and technology license information: http://techpartnerships.noaa.gov/sites/orta/Documents/RESEARCH%20LICENSE%2011-6-12.pdf
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