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Neuroadaptive effects after chronic CTDP 31446 treatment

Award Information
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services
Branch: National Institutes of Health
Contract: PHS2001-2
Agency Tracking Number: 1R41DA014774-01
Amount: $103,437.00
Phase: Phase I
Program: STTR
Solicitation Topic Code: N/A
Solicitation Number: N/A
Timeline
Solicitation Year: N/A
Award Year: 2001
Award Start Date (Proposal Award Date): N/A
Award End Date (Contract End Date): N/A
Small Business Information
160 2ND ST CAMBRIDGE, MA 02142
CAMBRIDGE, MA 02142
United States
DUNS: N/A
HUBZone Owned: No
Woman Owned: No
Socially and Economically Disadvantaged: No
Principal Investigator
 FRANK TARAZI
 (617) 855-3176
 FTARAZI@HMS.HARVARD.EDU
Business Contact
 BABICH, JOHN W
Phone: (617) 492-5554
Email: JBABICH@BIOSTREAM.NET
Research Institution
 MAILMAN RESEARCH CENTER, MCLEAN HOSPITAL
 
MAILMAN RESEARCH CENTER, MCLEAN HOSPITAL
BELMONT, MA 02478
United States

 Nonprofit college or university
Abstract

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Cocaine abuse remains a grave concern for
the American, and increasingly the world, population. As no current therapeutic
agents are available to assist cocaine addicts in achieving and maintaining
abstinence it is important that new pharmacotherapies be developed. One
important question not usually addressed in the development of new therapies
for the treatment of cocaine abuse is the neuroadaptive effects of chronic
administration of the pharmacotherapy. Cocaine use and subsequent withdrawal is
known to result in profound neuroadaptions, particularly in the monoaminergic
transporters. As any therapy that potentiates the changes induced by cocaine
would be expected to exuberate the symptoms of withdrawal, it is important to
address this question early in any cocaine medication development program. With
this in mind we will examine the effects of a novel pharmacotherapy, CTDP
31,446, which has been designated by NIDA as a preclinical development
candidate for the treatment of cocaine abuse. We will extend our promising
recent findings and examine the neuroadaptive effects of CTDP 31,446 on
different monoamine transporters after 7, 14, and 21 days of infusion.
Additional experiments will examine the persistence of these adaptations at
different time intervals following discontinuation of treatment.
PROPOSED COMMERCIAL APPLICATION:
Currently there are no proven medications for the treatment of cocaine abuse. The
sucessful completion of the work proposed here will ultimately lead to the development
and marketing of a drug for the treatment of cocaine addication.

* Information listed above is at the time of submission. *

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