You are here

Destruction of Chemical/Biological Warfare Agents using a Portable Microwave Emitter

Award Information
Agency: Department of Defense
Branch: Air Force
Contract: F33615-03-M-6374
Agency Tracking Number: F031-2179
Amount: $98,692.00
Phase: Phase I
Program: SBIR
Solicitation Topic Code: N/A
Solicitation Number: N/A
Timeline
Solicitation Year: N/A
Award Year: 2003
Award Start Date (Proposal Award Date): N/A
Award End Date (Contract End Date): N/A
Small Business Information
5301 Central Ave., NE, Suite 900, Albuquerque, NM, 87108
DUNS: 613718980
HUBZone Owned: N
Woman Owned: N
Socially and Economically Disadvantaged: N
Principal Investigator
 Andrew Motes
 Project Manager
 (505) 255-9797
 amotes@fiore-ind.com
Business Contact
 Bill Miera
Title: CEO
Phone: (505) 255-9797
Email: bmiera@fiore-ind.com
Research Institution
N/A
Abstract
Due to current threats against the United States, there is a very real need for an efficient, effective and portable method to neutralize or defeat unknown chemical and biological warfare agents (CBWAs). In the event of toxic agent attack on civiliantargets, a rapid and intelligent response by civilian authorities is required to minimize the spread and scope of the attack. It has been suggested that microwave exposure can be used to kill anthrax bacteria when used in conjunction withdiazoluminomelanin (DALM) chemical solution. Currently, there is a need for a portable microwave source that provides the required radiation intensity. Fiore Industries Inc has previously designed, built and tested a working portable microwave sourcethat meets the requirements for this process. A Fiore team, that includes Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute proposes to optimize this method and to demonstrate through testing and analysis that Fiore's existing microwave source can be used to killor neutralize a variety of biological and chemical agents. Due to current threats against the United States, there is a very real need for a generic method of destroying unknown chemical and biological warfare agents. In the event of toxic agent attack on civilian targets, a rapid and intelligent response bycivilian authorities is required to minimize the spread and scope of the attack. The ability to respond with one standard protocol in all cases allows for a rapid response. Having a generic way of neutralizing multiple agents also minimizes theconsequences of a failure to rapidly and correctly diagnose the agents involved, and further minimizes the risk in a multiple-agent attack. The potential customers for a novel and effective decontamination system include community hospitals, firedepartments, city emergency response teams, and countless other entities. The number of Community hospitals in the United States is ~4900, with another ~3000 not-for-profit hospitals and another ~1100 state and local government hospitals. There are over600 cities in the United States that posted populations greater than 50,000 in the 2000 census. Interest in bio/chemical decontamination is very high right now. At the end of the successful Phase II effort, the Fiore team foresees forming alimited-liability corporation with commercial rights to this technology, whose purpose is to take that technology to market.

* Information listed above is at the time of submission. *

US Flag An Official Website of the United States Government