Portable Near Infrared Technology for Detection of Traumatic Brain Injuries in Operational Environments

Award Information
Agency:
Department of Defense
Amount:
$97,981.00
Program:
SBIR
Contract:
N00014-04-M-0245
Solitcitation Year:
2004
Solicitation Number:
2004.1
Branch:
Navy
Award Year:
2004
Phase:
Phase I
Agency Tracking Number:
O041-DH4-3012
Solicitation Topic Code:
OSD04-DH4
Small Business Information
GEOPHEX LTD.
605 Mercury Street, Raleigh, NC, 27603
Hubzone Owned:
N
Woman Owned:
N
Socially and Economically Disadvantaged:
N
Duns:
148040447
Principal Investigator
 Stephen Norton
 Senior Scientist
 (919) 839-8515
 norton@geophex.com
Business Contact
 Steven Daib
Title: Contract Officer
Phone: (919) 839-8515
Email: daib@geophex.com
Research Institution
N/A
Abstract
Acute head trauma can cause disability and death without prompt diagnosis and treatment. The methods of choice for such diagnosis are x-ray CT or MRI, but these systems are costly and lack portability. Blood has an electrical conductivity and a dielectric permittivity about 50 to 100% higher than that of healthy brain tissue, depending on the excitation frequency. This suggests that an entirely non-contact technique for detecting bleeding in the brain (hematoma) could be based on a magnetic induction measurement that responds to anomalous changes in the conductivity between the skull and dura. One possible design of such a sensor would consist of concentric transmitting and receiving coils in close proximity to the head, but not touching. If the frequency is swept over a suitable range, then a one-dimensional profile of conductivity as a function of depth could be generated by exploiting the electromagnetic skin effect. The advantages of this approach over near-infrared spectroscopy include the non-contact nature of the measurement and the possibility of using a conductivity profile to delineate the dimensions of the hematoma. A conductivity sensor could be designed to be portable, compact and relatively inexpensive. A prototype sensor suitable for testing on tissue phantoms will be developed in Phase I.

* information listed above is at the time of submission.

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