High-Bandwidth High-Resolution Sensor for Hypersonic Flows

Award Information
Agency:
Department of Defense
Branch:
Air Force
Amount:
$749,600.00
Award Year:
2005
Program:
STTR
Phase:
Phase II
Contract:
F49620-05-C-0022
Agency Tracking Number:
F033-0195
Solicitation Year:
2003
Solicitation Topic Code:
AF03T013
Solicitation Number:
N/A
Small Business Information
INNOVATIVE SCIENTIFIC SOLUTIONS, INC.
2766 Indian Ripple Rd, Dayton, OH, 45440
Hubzone Owned:
N
Socially and Economically Disadvantaged:
N
Woman Owned:
N
Duns:
N/A
Principal Investigator
 Sivaram Gogineni
 Vice President and Dir. of Marketin
 (937) 255-8446
 sivaram.gogineni@wpafb.af.mil
Business Contact
 Larry Goss
Title: President
Phone: (937) 429-4980
Email: gosslp@innssi.com
Research Institution
 UNIV. OF NOTRE DAME
 Tom Corke
 101 Hessert Laboratory
Notre Dame, IN, 46556
 (574) 631-3261
 Nonprofit college or university
Abstract
A working prototype of a miniature 2 MHz a.c. driven, weakly-ionized plasma anemometer for measurements at hypersonic Mach numbers was developed during a Phase I effort. This device uses a plasma discharge between two encapsulated electrodes as the primary sensing element. The discharge has a demonstrated sensitivity to mean and dynamic mass-flux variations up to Mach number = 1.4 and 200 kHz respectively. In principle, a frequency response up to the 2 MHz carrier frequency is possible. The probe has also been tested for repeatability and has shown no hysteresis in its dependence to mass-flux. This sensor has applications for measurements in gas-turbine machinery, shock tubes, shock-boundary layer experiments, high-enthalpy hypersonic flows, and in plasma tunnels. The proposed Phase II effort is based on the success of the Phase I research and is designed to further advance and expand the capabilities of the plasma sensor to the point where it becomes a viable laboratory and industrial flow diagnostic tool. To achieve this we propose to: 1. Develop a working prototype with “turn-key” electronics suitable for research laboratory use. 2. Develop surface-mount plasma sensors for velocity, shear stress and acoustic measurements. 3. Develop wireless transmission of the sensor output. 4. Develop an integrate plasma sensor and actuator package. 5. Explore micro-packaging technology for plasma sensors for use in distributed sensing arrays.

* information listed above is at the time of submission.

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