Engineered Tungsten Surfaces for IFE Dry Chamber Walls

Award Information
Agency:
Department of Energy
Branch:
N/A
Amount:
$500,000.00
Award Year:
2003
Program:
STTR
Phase:
Phase II
Contract:
DE-FG02-03ER86166
Agency Tracking Number:
72762B03-I
Solicitation Year:
2003
Solicitation Topic Code:
35
Solicitation Number:
DOE/SC-0059
Small Business Information
Plasma Processes, Inc.
552 N. Batavia Avenue, Batavia, IL, 60510
Hubzone Owned:
N
Socially and Economically Disadvantaged:
N
Woman Owned:
N
Duns:
N/A
Principal Investigator
 John Scott O'Dell
 (256) 851-7653
 scottodell@plasmapros.com
Business Contact
 Linda Even
Phone: (256) 851-7653
Email: timmck@plasmapros.com
Research Institution
 University of California, San Diego
 University of California, San Diego
La Jolla, CA, 92093
 Nonprofit college or university
Abstract
72762B03-I In the generation of inertial fusion energy (IFE), ion bombardment of the chamber wall armor can result in ion accumulation, namely He, in the armor material, leading to fracture and failure of the armor. This is of particular concern for tungsten armor, in which helium migration is slow. Thus, a means of enhancing helium transport in the tungsten armor is needed. This project will develop engineered tungsten armor that solves the He entrapment problem, by providing a short bulk transport path for helium migration through the grain to the grain boundaries and an open nano-structure where helium transport is faster. At the same time, the engineered tungsten surfaces will be designed to withstand cyclic energy deposition. Phase I will develop novel fabrication techniques for the production of engineered tungsten surfaces with short transport paths for helium migration. A model will be developed to assess the performances of the engineered tungsten armor under IFE conditions. Then, experiments will be conducted to verify both the helium migration through the engineered tungsten surfaces and the robustness of the armor. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits as described by awardee: Potential commercial applications include ballistic and tactical missiles, gun barrel liners, arc-jet thrusters, heat exchangers, welding electrodes, plasma facing components for nuclear reactors, integral oxidation protection for burners, gas turbines, automobile engines, incinerators, thermal control coatings, oxidation protective coatings, coatings for composite parts and structures, thermal barrier coatings, structural jackets on tubular combustors and nozzles, and storage vessels.

* information listed above is at the time of submission.

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