Simultaneous Particle Imaging Velocimetry and Thermometry (PIVT) in Reacting Flows by Using Lanthanide Doped Nanoparticles

Award Information
Agency:
Department of Defense
Branch
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency
Amount:
$99,945.00
Award Year:
2009
Program:
STTR
Phase:
Phase I
Contract:
W911NF-09-C-0152
Award Id:
90037
Agency Tracking Number:
A09A-003-0280
Solicitation Year:
n/a
Solicitation Topic Code:
n/a
Solicitation Number:
n/a
Small Business Information
5100 Springfield Street, Suite 301, Dayton, OH, 45431
Hubzone Owned:
N
Minority Owned:
N
Woman Owned:
N
Duns:
782766831
Principal Investigator:
Sivaram Gogineni
Principal Investigator
(937) 266-9570
spgogineni@gmail.com
Business Contact:
Sivaram Gogineni
President
(937) 266-9570
sgogineni@spectralenergies.com
Research Institution:
Princeton University
Yiguang Ju
D330 Engineering Quad
Princeton, NJ, 8544
(609) 258-5644
Nonprofit college or university
Abstract
The goal for the proposed Phase I research is to develop a new particle imaging velocimetry and thermometry (PIVT) method to measure velocity and temperature distributions simultaneously in reactive and non-reactive flows by using lanthanide doped nanoparticles. Specifically, the proposed study includes four research tasks. First, lanthanide doped upconversion and down-conversion of oxide and fluoride nanoparticles will be synthesized and their photo-physical properties will be characterized. Second, the dependence of temperature sensitivity of oxide and silica coated fluoride nanoparticles on lanthanide ion concentrations, particle size, and host materials will be measured. Third, simultaneous measurements of temperature and velocity in a non-reactive counterflow will be conducted by using lanthanide doped nanoparticles. Finally, the feasibility of the phosphor based PIVT method for the measurements of temperature and velocity in a counterflow diffusion flame will be demonstrated and the effect of thermal radiation from the particles on the experimental accuracy will be investigated. The advantages of the present method include but not limited to low cost, high temperature sensitivity, non-intrusive measurements capability, low background scattering effect, and low pressure dependence. The success of the proposed research will enable simultaneous measurements of velocity and temperature in propulsion systems and contribute to the understanding of the physical processes and optimization of engine design.

* information listed above is at the time of submission.

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