Fan Flow Control for Improved Efficiency and Noise Reduction

Award Information
Agency:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Branch
n/a
Amount:
$499,917.00
Award Year:
2003
Program:
STTR
Phase:
Phase II
Contract:
NAS3-03077
Award Id:
61683
Agency Tracking Number:
010066
Solicitation Year:
n/a
Solicitation Topic Code:
n/a
Solicitation Number:
n/a
Small Business Information
2901 Prosperity Road, Blacksburg, VA, 24060
Hubzone Owned:
N
Minority Owned:
N
Woman Owned:
N
Duns:
n/a
Principal Investigator:
Sarah Stitzel
Research Engineer
(540) 961-4401
sstitzel@techsburg.com
Business Contact:
Stephen Guillot
VP Engineering
(540) 961-4401
sguillot@techsburg.com
Research Institution:
Virginia Polytechnic Institute
Ricardo Burdisson
460 Turner Street, Suite 306
Blacksburg, VA, 24061
(540) 231-7355
Nonprofit college or university
Abstract
Techsburg, Inc. and the Vibrations and Acoustics Laboratory at Virginia Tech (VAL) are proposing an innovative flow control scheme for fan rotors designed to simultaneously increase fan loading and efficiency while reducing fan radiated noise. The technology uses optimized blowing to prevent flow separation and significantly reduce the downstream wake size. A Phase I STTR proved the feasibility of using suction surface blowing jets to produce a sound power reduction on the order of 7dB and a reduction in losses of 60%. This research will combine an optimized flow control design with alternating blowing concepts. Using alternating blowing with an acoustic liner to attenuate the broadband noise will allow us to maximize the noise reduction and minimize the required mass flow. The amount of work produced by a single compression stage is limited by the amount of diffusion that can occur without large-scale flow separation. Viscous losses within the separated region not only result in an efficiency penalty but also create a large wake behind each of the rotor blades that interact with the downstream exit guide vanes and stators. Left untreated, fan exhaust noise from this interaction is the most dominant perceived noise at takeoff and landing. By using flow control to eliminate separation and the rotor wake, both efficiency gains and noise reduction can be achieved.

* information listed above is at the time of submission.

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