Photo-Enhanced Hydrogen Transport Technology for Clean Renewable Electrochemical Energy Systems

Award Information
Agency:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Branch:
N/A
Amount:
$100,000.00
Award Year:
2011
Program:
STTR
Phase:
Phase I
Contract:
NNX11CI32P
Agency Tracking Number:
100130
Solicitation Year:
2010
Solicitation Topic Code:
T8.03
Solicitation Number:
N/A
Small Business Information
Phenom Technologies, Inc
5300 Palmer Lane, Suite 2A, Williamsburg, VA, 23188-2794
Hubzone Owned:
N
Socially and Economically Disadvantaged:
N
Woman Owned:
N
Duns:
962537739
Principal Investigator
 Gunter Luepke
 Principal Investigator
 (757) 221-1894
 luepke@wm.edu
Business Contact
 Erik Spahr
Title: President
Phone: (757) 784-4647
Email: erik.spahr@phenom-tech.com
Research Institution
 College of William and Mary
 Cynthia Corbett
 Grants&Research Admin.
Williamsburg, VA, 23187-8795
 () -
 Nonprofit college or university
Abstract
Solid oxide fuel cells and electrolyzers are promising electrochemical devices for space and terrestrial applications due to their high power densities and clean operation. Furthermore, proton-conducting oxides have the potential to allow lower operational temperatures and promote more reliable and longer-lived devicesÂ?both valuable attributes for space applicationsÂ?however, practical devices are not yet realized because of insufficient proton mobility at moderate temperatures. Phenom Technologies, Inc. has identified a new non-thermal technique to dramatically enhance the mobility of protons in solid oxides using resonant infrared irradiation to excite molecular O-H vibrations in the material. In our earlier work, we have shown that this photo-enhanced hydrogen transport effect can increase the proton diffusion rate in solid oxides by nine orders of magnitude. In this Phase I STTR proposal, we will build on our established research to complete a proof of concept study and lay the foundation for Phase II prototype development of a "photo-enhanced" solid oxide electrolyte for fuel cells and electrolyzers. This study will address NASA's need for more reliable and efficient solid oxide electrochemical components for clean renewable energy systems.

* information listed above is at the time of submission.

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