Evaluation of Airborne Particle Emissions from Commercial Products Containing Eng

Award Information
Agency:
Department of Health and Human Services
Branch
n/a
Amount:
$99,237.00
Award Year:
2010
Program:
STTR
Phase:
Phase I
Contract:
1R41ES019384-01
Agency Tracking Number:
R41ES019384
Solicitation Year:
2010
Solicitation Topic Code:
NIEHS
Solicitation Number:
PHS2010-2
Small Business Information
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
3006 LONGHORN BLVD, #107, AUSTIN, TX, 78758-
Hubzone Owned:
N
Socially and Economically Disadvantaged:
N
Woman Owned:
N
Duns:
013475129
Principal Investigator:
BETSY SHELTON
(512) 339-5020
bshelton@appliednanotech.net
Business Contact:
BETSY SHELTON
(319) 335-2123
nih@uiowa.edu
Research Institution:
University Of Iowa

UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
IOWA CITY, IA, 52242-
() -
Nonprofit college or university
Abstract
DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): This multiphase STTR project will result in a standard method to evaluate the release of airborne particles from commercial products that contain engineered nanomaterials during their use or disposal. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an important class of engineered nanomaterials that are incorporated into diverse products such as sporting goods, clothes, electronic components, concrete products, water purification devices, and automobile parts. Although little is known about the fate of these materials as the products that contain them are used and disposed, our preliminary data suggest that abrasion of CNT nanocomposites (epoxy with embedded CNTs) can release substantial quantities of airborne nanomaterials. Information of this type is critical to assess the environmental, health, and safety risks associated with introducing these products to the general public. For the Phase I effort, we will construct a testing apparatus and develop a standard method to characterize airborne particle emissions (size, shape, composition, and rate) when products that contain engineered nanomaterials undergo life-cycle events, such as abrasion, breakage, and shredding (Aim 1). We will then use this method to evaluate the emissions from the abrasion of CNT nanocomposites (Aim 2). The success of this project will be defined as the ability to identify airborne particles that contain CNTs apart from other particles emitted during abrasion. In Phase II we will broaden our method to include simulations of other use and disposal events (e.g. breakage, shredding), as well as the effects of environmental stresses (e.g., exposure to temperature extremes, UV exposure, erosion processes) on the release of nanomaterials from CNT nanocomposites. Ultimately, this work will lead to a small business that evaluates the ramifications of processing, use, and degradation of commercial products that contain engineered nanomaterials. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: This work will result in a standard method to characterize airborne particles released from commercial products that contain engineered nanomaterials during their use or disposal. The extent to which engineered nanomaterials are released into a person's breathing zone during life-cycle events is essential to estimating the risk associated with introducing these products to the general public on health and the environment.

* information listed above is at the time of submission.

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