E-band Radiation Hardened Low Noise Amplifier

Award Information
Agency:
Department of Defense
Branch
Air Force
Amount:
$98,524.00
Award Year:
2011
Program:
SBIR
Phase:
Phase I
Contract:
FA8750-11-C-0145
Agency Tracking Number:
F103-057-1630
Solicitation Year:
2010
Solicitation Topic Code:
AF103-057
Solicitation Number:
2010.3
Small Business Information
PRINCETON MICROWAVE TECHNOLOGY INC
UNIT C-10, 3 NAMI LANE, MERCERVILLE, NJ, -
Hubzone Owned:
Y
Socially and Economically Disadvantaged:
Y
Woman Owned:
Y
Duns:
796754315
Principal Investigator:
Daniel Bechtel
Senior Member of Technical Staff
(609) 586-8140
sarjit@princetonmicrowave.com
Business Contact:
Amarjit Bharj
President
(609) 586-8140
amarjit@princetonmicrowave.com
Research Institution:
Stub




Abstract
ABSTRACT: In October of 2003 the FCC opened the 71-76 GHz, 81-86 GHz, and 92-95 GHz for commercial use. Since these bands are also available for satellite applications there is a need for space-qualifiable front-end E-band components developed in parallel with robust components for terrestrial use. Phase I effort focuses on developing an E-band low-noise amplifier (LNA) design, using 0.15um technology and then validating the design with modeling and simulation. This effort will make non-traditional bands such as 81-86 GHz available for military applications. The LNA design has specific goals in low noise-figure, small-signal gain, wide operating temperature range, and radiation-hardness. In Phase I we will be identifying the most favorable device technologies and foundries in terms of both the focused Phase I radiation-hardened LNA objectives. We consider the most favorable device technology to be AlGaN/GaN fabricated on SiC and the most favorable foundry to be HRL. This viewpoint is based on system considerations: GaN has at least an order-of-magnitude better self-protection capability than GaAs or InP, it has the potential for higher-power transceiver MMICs, and it has a higher radiation tolerance than competing technologies. However, InP has a lower noise and higher gain and has sufficient radiation hardness. Uncertainties include the time that will be needed to bring GaN"s current high costs down relatively to other technologies. BENEFIT: This effort will align with the overall Air Force effort to make bands such as 81-86 GHz available for military applications.

* information listed above is at the time of submission.

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