Rapid diagnostic tools for wound infections

Award Information
Agency:
Department of Defense
Amount:
$1,899,828.00
Program:
SBIR
Contract:
W911NF-13-C-0047
Solitcitation Year:
2011
Solicitation Number:
2011.1
Branch:
Army
Award Year:
2013
Phase:
Phase II
Agency Tracking Number:
A2-5021
Solicitation Topic Code:
A11-021
Small Business Information
Spectral Platforms
5652 Stardust Road, Spectral Platforms, La Canada, CA, 91011-2827
Hubzone Owned:
N
Woman Owned:
N
Socially and Economically Disadvantaged:
N
Duns:
962639931
Principal Investigator
 Ravi Verma
 CEO
 (626) 532-7284
 rverma@spectralplatforms.com
Business Contact
 Ravi Verma
Title: CEO
Phone: (626) 532-7284
Email: rverma@spectralplatforms.com
Research Institution
 Stub
Abstract
Wound infections that result in bacteremia and even mortality are a significant problem among soldiers with soft tissue/burn injuries. Overall morbidity associated with such wounds could be reduced substantially if the infectious etiology of these infections was clarified rapidly, especially for the presence of select multidrug-resistant pathogens. Current methods for diagnosing wound infections are too time-consuming to be relevant, and so new diagnostic tools are required. In our Phase I, we developed and demonstrated a new optical biomarker that can detect bacteria at clinically relevant concentrations. We demonstrated the efficacy of this biomarker by accurately characterizing the presence/absence of bacteria in the plasma of blood obtained from hospitalized febrile patients. We also demonstrated a UV Raman modulation scheme that could be used to distinguish different pathogens. In the Phase II proposed here, we will extend this biomarker to characterize wound infections. We will show that we can accurately detect, characterize and distinguish the presence of MDR pathogens in the milieu of commensal bacteria that are often present at a wound site. With the availability of drugs that can target even the most drug-resistant pathogens, rapid confirmation of the presence of such pathogens can improve the outcome for wounded soldiers. In our Phase I, we developed and demonstrated a new optical biomarker that can detect bacteria at clinically relevant concentrations. We demonstrated the efficacy of this biomarker by accurately characterizing the presence/absence of bacteria in the plasma of blood obtained from hospitalized febrile patients. We also demonstrated a UV Raman modulation scheme that could be used to subclassify pathogens. In the Phase II proposed here, we will extend this biomarker to characterize wound infections. We will show that we can accurately detect, characterize and distinguish the presence of MDR pathogens in the milieu of commensal bacteria that are often present at a wound site. With the availability of drugs that can target even the most drug-resistant pathogens, rapid confirmation of the presence of such pathogens can improve the outcome for wounded soldiers.

* information listed above is at the time of submission.

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