Advanced Deposition Capability for Oxidation&Corrosion Protection Coatings

Award Information
Agency:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Branch
n/a
Amount:
$123,970.00
Award Year:
2013
Program:
STTR
Phase:
Phase I
Contract:
NNX13CC70P
Award Id:
n/a
Agency Tracking Number:
120132
Solicitation Year:
2012
Solicitation Topic Code:
T12.01
Solicitation Number:
n/a
Small Business Information
2 Boars Head Lane, Charlottesville, VA, -
Hubzone Owned:
N
Minority Owned:
N
Woman Owned:
N
Duns:
036500804
Principal Investigator:
Susie Eustis
Research Scientist
(434) 977-1405
susie.eustis@directedvapor.com
Business Contact:
Matthew Terry
Business Official
(434) 296-3678
mmterry@directedvapor.com
Research Institution:
Univ. of Pittsburgh
Shannon Hukriede
123 University Place
Pittsburgh, PA, 15213-15213
() -
Domestic nonprofit research organization
Abstract
NASA's long range goals of reducing the fuel consumption by 30% and increasing fuel efficiency by 35% can be partially accomplished through increasing engine operation temperatures. As a result, the disk section is desired to operate in increasingly higher temperatures, which will subject it to additional degradation mechanisms of oxidation and hot corrosion. One approach to enhance the temperature capability of these systems is through the incorporation of environmental protective coatings which can provide resistance from oxidation and hot corrosion. Research is proposed here to optimize the use of advanced coating manufacturing techniques designed to enable the affordable application of environmental protective coatings having enhanced resistance to hot corrosion and oxidation to allow operation at the desired high temperature engine environments. Advanced testing conditions will be used to simulate real world conditions and demonstrate the performance of the deposited coatings in these conditions. This approach is envisioned to aid the development of advanced coatings required to protect the surface of turbine disk components at higher temperatures desired for fuel and thrust operationally improvement without inducing significant fatigue debit. Advanced coating systems will be applied in this work onto coupons, and subcomponents to demonstrate coating capability and allow simulated engine environment testing in follow on programs. Success in meeting the objectives will significantly aid the temperature capability of turbine disk components, allowing significant fuel efficiency and thrust increases for turbine engines.

* information listed above is at the time of submission.

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