Nano-Enhanced CFRP with Improved Thermal Conductivity

Award Information
Agency:
Department of Defense
Amount:
$99,895.00
Program:
SBIR
Contract:
W31P4Q-14-C-0020
Solitcitation Year:
2013
Solicitation Number:
2013.2
Branch:
Army
Award Year:
2013
Phase:
Phase I
Agency Tracking Number:
A132-070-0462
Solicitation Topic Code:
A13-070
Small Business Information
Applied Sciences, Inc.
141 W. Xenia Ave., PO Box 579, Cedarville, OH, -
Hubzone Owned:
N
Woman Owned:
N
Socially and Economically Disadvantaged:
N
Duns:
173666215
Principal Investigator
 Patrick D. Lake
 Director of Composite Materials
 (937) 766-2020
 pdlake@apsci.com
Business Contact
 Max Lake
Title: President
Phone: (937) 766-2020
Email: mllake@apsci.com
Research Institution
 Stub
Abstract
The Army is seeking to implement composite materials to replace aluminum in missile structures, but the limitations in composite thermal conductivity pose a threat of overheating on the electronics. To solve this problem, Applied Sciences, Inc. (ASI) proposes to develop an advanced carbon nanofiber (CNF) sheetgood capable of increasing the composite thermal conductivity by an order of magnitude while simultaneously retaining or enhancing the composite mechanical properties (especially compressive and tensile properties). ASI has performed limited testing of a new carbon nanomaterial product form, called CNF Mat, which has shown ability to: enhance composite mechanical properties, enable weight reduction, and achieve greater than 325 W/m-K in preliminary formulations. Measurements made on CNFs alone have shown thermal conductivities in excess of 1500 W/m-K, illustrating the potential for improving the CNF mat and thus the composite thermal conductivity. In this project, the Phase I team will utilize thermo-mechanical modeling to guide the materials development effort. In addition, through support and contributions from a major prime contractor, ASI will fabricate and fully characterize the thermal and mechanical properties of advanced, lightweight composite materials suitable to replace aluminum in missile structures.

* information listed above is at the time of submission.

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