SBIR Phase I: Development of a Selectively Current-permeable Osteogenic Pedicle Screw Surface for Vertebral Fusion

Award Information
Agency:
National Science Foundation
Branch
n/a
Amount:
$150,000.00
Award Year:
2013
Program:
SBIR
Phase:
Phase I
Contract:
1248546
Award Id:
n/a
Agency Tracking Number:
1248546
Solicitation Year:
2012
Solicitation Topic Code:
BC
Solicitation Number:
n/a
Small Business Information
535 W. Research Center Boulevard, Suite 135, M/S 2600, Fayetteville, AR, 72701-6948
Hubzone Owned:
Y
Minority Owned:
N
Woman Owned:
N
Duns:
078399483
Principal Investigator:
Matthew MacEwan
(479) 571-2592
matt.macewan@osteovantage.com
Business Contact:
Matthew MacEwan
(479) 571-2592
matt.macewan@osteovantage.com
Research Institution:
Stub




Abstract
This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project will develop a selectively direct-current permeable pedicle screw surface for use with patent-pending osteogenic spinal fusion instrumentation. New bone matrix more rapidly incorporates the bone graft material in the presence of an electric field to form a robust, biomechanically sound, intersegmental union. As the screw transmits current into the bone, peri-screw anchorage strength is also increased because of the local osteogenic effects. Pedicle screw loosening is a factor that contributes to clinically unacceptable failure rate (20-40%) associated with spinal fusion surgery. Based on preliminary work, the proposed instrumentation system has the potential to significantly improve outcomes by increasing fusion rate and robustness. Precise control of the electric field delivered through the pedicle screws is necessary to optimize the osteogenic capabilities. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is the development of commercially available osteogenic instrumentation with the potential to improve surgical outcomes, thus reducing the high incidence of additional surgery, chronic pain and cost associated with failed fusion. In future iterations, it could potentially be used to accelerate fracture repair of the skull, face, and other sites. Because bone repair mechanisms are similar across species, it may one day offer veterinary orthopedic surgeons a means to help their animal patients.

* information listed above is at the time of submission.

Agency Micro-sites


SBA logo

Department of Agriculture logo

Department of Commerce logo

Department of Defense logo

Department of Education logo

Department of Energy logo

Department of Health and Human Services logo

Department of Homeland Security logo

Department of Transportation logo

Enviromental Protection Agency logo

National Aeronautics and Space Administration logo

National Science Foundation logo
US Flag An Official Website of the United States Government