Multibeam Healing for Laser Micromachining in Manufacturing

Award Information
Agency:
Department of Health and Human Services
Branch
n/a
Amount:
$198,585.00
Award Year:
2006
Program:
SBIR
Phase:
Phase I
Contract:
1R43EB005646-01A1
Agency Tracking Number:
EB005646
Solicitation Year:
2006
Solicitation Topic Code:
n/a
Solicitation Number:
PHS2006-2
Small Business Information
RADIATION MONITORING DEVICES, INC.
44 Hunt Street, Watertown, MA, 02472
Hubzone Owned:
N
Socially and Economically Disadvantaged:
N
Woman Owned:
N
Duns:
n/a
Principal Investigator:
BIPIN SINGH
(617) 668-6934
BSINGH@RMDINC.COM
Business Contact:
GERALD ENTINE
(617) 668-6801
GENTINE@RMDINC.COM
Research Institution:
n/a
Abstract
DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): There is a considerable interest in using laser-manufacturing methods for medical applications due to their potential to reduce cost. In fact, the precision and low-force signature of lasers makes them very attractive alternatives to traditional machining methods for brittle materials such as lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) and gadolinium oxyorthosilciate (GSO) used in high-resolution medical imaging. However, material damage, especially micro-scale cracking, during laser machining is a frequently encountered problem that results in added costs, needless scrap, and reduced performance/reliability. We propose to demonstrate the feasibility of developing a multibeam laser healing technique to eliminate micro-cracks formed during laser machining of brittle materials like scintillators. We will use a simultaneous multibeam approach for micromachining and defect healing to improve the strength/reliability during laser manufacturing. Experimental investigations will be supported by finite-element modeling of the process including the calculation of damage inducing thermal-stresses. The proposed research on laser healing will significantly improve both yield and reliability during laser machining, resulting in an order of magnitude reduction in cost. Additionally, the reduced inter-pixel gaps resulting from the laser pixelation technique will significantly improve detector performance. Therefore, the proposed research has great commercial relevance, especially for high-resolution medical imaging applications.

* information listed above is at the time of submission.

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