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Contact Stress Design Parameters for Titanium Bearings

Award Information
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Branch: N/A
Contract: NNX15CJ23P
Agency Tracking Number: 154208
Amount: $124,085.00
Phase: Phase I
Program: SBIR
Solicitation Topic Code: H4.02
Solicitation Number: N/A
Timeline
Solicitation Year: 2015
Award Year: 2015
Award Start Date (Proposal Award Date): 2015-06-17
Award End Date (Contract End Date): 2015-12-17
Small Business Information
Wampus Lane, Milford, CT, 06460-4861
DUNS: 001178680
HUBZone Owned: N
Woman Owned: N
Socially and Economically Disadvantaged: N
Principal Investigator
 Brian Battisti
 Principal Investigator
 (203) 878-4691
 battistib@airlockinc.com
Business Contact
 Brian Battisti
Title: Business Official
Phone: (203) 878-4691
Email: battistib@airlockinc.com
Research Institution
N/A
Abstract
In response to NASA 2015 SBIR Topic H4.02, Air-Lock proposes to define the maximum allowable contact stress for Titanium bearings. The modulus of Titanium is lower than legacy spacesuit bearing materials (Stainless Steel). Due to this, Titanium bearings are more susceptible to deflection under man and plug load scenarios. Bearing deflection causes a limited number of balls to absorb the full load and results in higher, localized, contact stresses. Localized contact stress is believed to be the main contributor to the bearing race degradation observed during NASA's 2014 oxygen compatibility testing. In Phase 1, we will correlate analytical contact stress data with sample bearing test data. This correlation will characterize bearing wear and degradation relative to ball contact stress. Multiple test iterations will be performed to clearly identify the contact stress that degrades a titanium race. We will also determine if there are commercial surface treatments (coatings) that may enhance Titanium wear resistance. At the conclusion of Phase 1, we shall have identified the maximum allowable bearing contact stress. This data point will serve as a valuable design guideline for future bearing designs and should yield reduced certification and development costs.

* Information listed above is at the time of submission. *

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