SBIR/STTR Phase II: A Fast Parallel Grid-Free Method for Simulating Turbulent Incompressible Flow In/Around Time-Varying Geometries

Award Information
Agency:
National Science Foundation
Branch
n/a
Amount:
$500,000.00
Award Year:
2002
Program:
SBIR
Phase:
Phase II
Contract:
n/a
Award Id:
58671
Agency Tracking Number:
0216671
Solicitation Year:
n/a
Solicitation Topic Code:
n/a
Solicitation Number:
n/a
Small Business Information
1800 East Garry Avenue, Suite 214, Santa Ana, CA, 92705
Hubzone Owned:
N
Minority Owned:
N
Woman Owned:
N
Duns:
n/a
Principal Investigator:
AdrinGharakhani
(949) 261-7797
adrin@Applied-Scientific.com
Business Contact:
() -
Research Institute:
n/a
Abstract
This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project builds on algorithms developed for simulating turbulent incompressible flows in and around time-varying geometries. The Phase II project proposes to develop and commercialize a state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics (CFD) package utilizing the algorithms developed. The computational engine is based upon an advanced parallel, adaptive fast multipole (FMM) implementation of a 3-D Lagrangian vortex-boundary element method. Turbulence is accounted for via Large Eddy Simulation (LES) using a dynamic Smagorinsky sub-grid scale model. The method is (1) grid-free in the fluid domain, (2) virtually free of numerical diffusion, (3) inherently solution-adaptive, and (4) capable of modeling inhomogeneous unsteady wall-bounded turbulent flow. During Phase II additional innovative algorithms will be developed for FMM to substantially increase it computational speed as well as accuracy. Additionally, an LES model for unsteady inhomogeneous flows will be implemented and tested rigorously using problems of potential interest to industry. The software is ideal for simulation and analysis of complex laminar-through-turbulent flow phenomena involving massive flow separation, unsteady vortex shedding, transient jets in cross-stream, and wake-body interaction. Examples of interest to industry are flow over bluff bodies such as ground vehicles or buildings, in data storage units with rotating and moving parts; in internal combustion engines; and in and around rotating machinery such as pumps and fans.

* information listed above is at the time of submission.

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