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NOTE: The Solicitations and topics listed on this site are copies from the various SBIR agency solicitations and are not necessarily the latest and most up-to-date. For this reason, you should visit the respective agency SBIR sites to read the official version of the solicitations and download the appropriate forms and rules.

Displaying 161 - 170 of 19117 results
  1. 8.2.4C: Online Tools for Incorporating Climate Information into TV Weather Reports

    Release Date: 01-01-2011Open Date: 01-20-2011Due Date: 04-01-2011Close Date: 04-01-2011

    A logical place to begin to address the public climate literacy problem is through the national network of local TV meteorologists’ daily weather reports and forecasts. Research shows that the majority of Americans’ largest single daily source of exposure to scientific information of any kind is through local TV weather reports.3 Thus, a goal for this year’s SBIR call should be to innovative new tools and techniques for incorporating timely climate data and climate information services into TV meteorologists’ nightly weather reports.

    SBIRPhase IDepartment of CommerceNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
  2. 8.3.1R: Sensor for Measurement of Black Carbon from Balloons

    Release Date: 01-01-2011Open Date: 01-20-2011Due Date: 04-01-2011Close Date: 04-01-2011

    The objective of this subtopic is to develop an inexpensive, potentially disposable sensor for measuring Black Carbon (BC) aerosols in the atmosphere. The sensor will have sufficient analytical performance to yield useful data when carried on a balloon or dropped as a sonde from an aircraft. The sensor will report position coordinates and BC concentration in a format compatible with radiosonde telemetry.

    SBIRPhase IDepartment of CommerceNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
  3. 8.3.2R: Airborne Wave Height Sensor Based on Multistatic GPS RADAR

    Release Date: 01-01-2011Open Date: 01-20-2011Due Date: 04-01-2011Close Date: 04-01-2011

    The assimilation of sea wave heights and related winds into ocean models and verification of the NWS wave forecast model improves their accuracy. To map ocean surface topography and wave heights, satellite and airborne radars are currently used. However, those instruments are expensive and are not suitable for installation on board small platforms such as the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS). Recent research has been performed using reflected signals of the U.S. Global Positioning System (GPS).

    SBIRPhase IDepartment of CommerceNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
  4. 8.3.3D: Hyperspectral Microwave Sensor

    Release Date: 01-01-2011Open Date: 01-20-2011Due Date: 04-01-2011Close Date: 04-01-2011

    Passive Microwave Sensors have existed for several decades, as ground-based, airborne or space-borne. They provide a wealth of information about the atmosphere, the surface, the hydrometeors (rain, ice, etc) and are invaluable for weather prediction. Modern passive microwave space-borne sensors and even planned sensors have only a limited number of channels available, totaling anywhere between 5 and 30 channels. This limited number of channels has been shown to be insufficient to solve for the illposed nature of the inversion of the geophysical state from space-borne measurements.

    SBIRPhase IDepartment of CommerceNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
  5. A2: Fundamental Aeronautics

    Release Date: 07-18-2011Open Date: 07-18-2011Due Date: 09-08-2011Close Date: 09-08-2011

    The Fundamental Aeronautics Program conducts cutting-edge research to achieve technological capabilities necessary to overcome national challenges in air transportation including reduced noise, emissions, and fuel consumption, increased mobility through a faster means of transportation, and the ability to ascend/descend through planetary atmospheres. These technological capabilities enable design solutions for performance and environmental challenges of future air vehicles.

    SBIRPhase INational Aeronautics and Space Administration
  6. A3: Airspace Systems

    Release Date: 07-18-2011Open Date: 07-18-2011Due Date: 09-08-2011Close Date: 09-08-2011

    NASA's Airspace Systems Program (ASP) is investing in the development, validation and transfer of advanced innovative concepts, technologies and procedures to support the development of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). This investment includes partnerships with other government agencies represented in the Joint Planning and Development Office (JPDO), including the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and joint activities with the U.S. aeronautics industry and academia.

    SBIRPhase INational Aeronautics and Space Administration
  7. A4: Aeronautics Test Technologies

    Release Date: 07-18-2011Open Date: 07-18-2011Due Date: 09-08-2011Close Date: 09-08-2011

    test bed aircraft, and the simulation and loads laboratories. A key component of ensuring a test facility's long-term viability is to implement and continually improve on the efficiency and effectiveness of that facility's operations along with developing new technologies to address the nation's future aerospace challenges. To operate a facility in this manner requires the use of state-of-the-art test technologies and test techniques, creative facility performance capability enhancements, and novel means of acquiring test data.

    SBIRPhase INational Aeronautics and Space Administration
  8. A1: Aviation Safety

    Release Date: 07-18-2011Open Date: 07-18-2011Due Date: 09-08-2011Close Date: 09-08-2011

    The Aviation Safety Program conducts fundamental research and technology development of known and predicted safety concerns as the nation transitions to the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). Future challenges to maintaining aviation safety arise from expected significant increases in air traffic, continued operation of legacy vehicles, introduction of new vehicle concepts, increased reliance on automation, and increased operating complexity.

    SBIRPhase INational Aeronautics and Space Administration
  9. A1.01: Aviation External Hazard Sensor Technologies

    Release Date: 07-18-2011Open Date: 07-18-2011Due Date: 09-08-2011Close Date: 09-08-2011

    NASA is concerned with new and innovative methods for detection, identification, evaluation, and monitoring of in-flight hazards to aviation. NASA seeks to foster research and development that leads to innovative new technologies and methods, or significant improvements in existing technologies, for in-flight hazard avoidance and mitigation. Technologies may take the form of tools, models, techniques, procedures, substantiated guidelines, prototypes, and devices.

    SBIRPhase INational Aeronautics and Space Administration
  10. A1.02: Inflight Icing Hazard Mitigation Technology

    Release Date: 07-18-2011Open Date: 07-18-2011Due Date: 09-08-2011Close Date: 09-08-2011

    NASA is concerned with the prevention of encounters with hazardous in-flight conditions and the mitigation of their effects when they do occur. Under this subtopic, proposals are invited that explore new and dramatically improved technologies related to inflight airframe and engine icing hazards for manned and unmanned vehicles. Technologies of interest should address the detection, measurement, a ...

    SBIRPhase INational Aeronautics and Space Administration
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